Vanessa Brown,  Late Night Trip to the Jeweller’s , 2018, installation view. Photo credit: John Dean   LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:    http://akimbo.ca/akimblog/?id=1387

Vanessa Brown, Late Night Trip to the Jeweller’s, 2018, installation view. Photo credit: John Dean

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:

http://akimbo.ca/akimblog/?id=1387

AKIMBO | Vanessa Brown: Lat Night Trip to the Jeweller's

CALGARY
LINDSAY SORELL
VANESSA BROWN AT ESKER FOUNDATION
August 15, 2018

It could be Esker Foundation’s revolving entrance door, but my breath is taken away by the theatrical display that greets me from a semi-circular dais. Two sheer black housecoats stand upright with sleeves extended as if actors from The Costume Institute. They hang on simple steel stands, reminiscent of kimono displays, with earrings hung inside and outside on their fabric. Some are made of dried flowers and others of sculpted metal, like charms to be carried with the wearer of the coat. Then, after getting context from these human-scale housecoats and earrings, we enter a giant world.Next to the housecoats, hanging on an enormous stand, are two large-scale, pastel-coloured earrings, complete with massive ear hooks. Next to the earrings lie two more on the dais, face-down, displaying a secret compartment on their backs to hold a single cigarette. Behind them, leaning against the wall on the dais, is a gravestone-shaped piece of metal engraved with symbols: wine glasses, a teardrop, a snake. These motifs repeat throughout the exhibition. Above all, a clock on the wall is too tired to observe, its eyelash-rimmed eyes sleeping, its numbers askew, and its hour and minute hands absurdly long. 

This piece, titled Late Night Trip to the Jeweller’s and part of Vanessa Brown’s exhibition The Witching Hour, is the recounting of an artist’s “stress-induced fever dream” where language is a system of symbols, and information or stories must be passed along the inside of garments. The work is stunning for its playful imaginativeness and skilful craftsmanship. It revels in the humorous impracticality, the anti-usefulness, of its objects: earrings too big to be worn, a clock that doesn’t work, a housecoat primarily meant to transfer messages. All of Brown’s steel and MDF sculptures follow this theme of humorous myth-making, ghostly silhouettes, and child-like – but large-scale – charms. The exhibition is an extended nightmare of a still life. 

The staged presentation of the work and its highlighted relationship to the body calls to mind the artist’s expressed interest in fashion and, in particular, the minimalist, gender fluid ‘anti-fashion’explosion of the 1990s in Paris that included Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto. These designers, both having moved from Japan to France, played a transformative anti-Imperialist role in fashion at the time, rejecting trends and traditionally gendered silhouettes for more minimal works, often with unfinished, scrappy hems or variations on the kimono. The role of wearable art in collapsing gender roles and flipping the gendering of professions runs parallel to Brown’s use of steel. She contextualizes steel as feminized and jewellery as de-feminized, and challenges associations with scale as carrying a gendered power. Reactionary now to our time, The Witching Hour realizes the mythical space between three and four a.m. when the dreams and spells of women can thrive. 


Vanessa Brown: The Witching Hour continues until September 2. 
Esker Foundation: https://eskerfoundation.com/ 
The gallery is accessible


Lindsay Sorell is an artist and writer who recently collaborated with the Advanced Toastmasters of Calgary for the IKG Live 1 performance festival and completed two solo exhibitions of new work:Exercises in Healing at Contemporary Calgary and Buddha, Why Am I Alone? at AVALANCHE! Institute of Contemporary Art. She is currently working on a large-scale watercolour painting of food and is the editor of Luma Quarterly. She is Akimblog's Calgary correspondent and can be followed on Instagram.


  Veils of a Bog , 2018. Vanesa Brown. From The Witching Hour at The Esker Foundation Image credit: John Dean    LINK HERE:    http://www.gallerieswest.ca/events/vanessa-brown-the-witching-hour/   

Veils of a Bog, 2018. Vanesa Brown. From The Witching Hour at The Esker Foundation
Image credit: John Dean 

LINK HERE:

http://www.gallerieswest.ca/events/vanessa-brown-the-witching-hour/
 

GALLERIES WEST | Vanessa Brown: The Witching Hour

Opening Reception: Friday 25 May, 6 - 10 pm
MAY 26, 2018 TO SEP 2, 2018

Curated by Shauna Thompson

Vanessa Brown works in the space between strength and fragility through an alchemical fusing of steel, pigment, glass, and textile. Her work is hybrid and multidimensional: sculpture flirting with painting, symbolic narrative collage, a physical gestalt of states of consciousness. The Witching Hour brings together new installations and recent works, ranging in scale from larger-than-life to intimate. It is a proposal in material, colour, light, and sound; an invitation into an emotively charmed circle where magic, fantasy, and humour offer coded strategies to consider material histories, our connection to the natural and supernatural worlds, and gendered systems of labour, communication, and value.

Through a number of interrelated installations, Brown welcomes us into the liminal space between dreaming and consciousness, between the visionary and the here-and-now. Working primarily with steel, her imaginative formal constellations critique and counter the material’s traditional associations with the monumental, masculine, and its use in aggressive industry and military efforts. For Brown, the allure of steel rests in its subtler qualities, such as its malleability, adaptability, and delicateness attributes that allude to the rich territory of feminized narratives and material associations.

The exhibition leads us through a series of fantastic scenarios: a midnight trip to the jeweller’s piercing parlour; the comforting embrace of the bog; and within the light-filled, nurturing garden shed. The symbology of each scene—through material and form—is a dense and surreal system of storytelling. The entrance into Brown’s speculative reality—through the jeweller’s piercing parlour—greets us with a shop floor arranged with all of the accessories one might need for an otherworldly journey: robes for sleepwalking and daydreaming wait on their hangers for absent bodies; oversized earrings oscillate between the figurative and the abstract. Our state of consciousness is uncertain; an exhausted clock slumbers over our heads. While she is asleep, the rules of time and space have slipped. Against the wall rests a menu of options incised into steel, written in an unfamiliar symbolic language. The act of engraving is reminiscent both of tattooing into skin and also of engraving jewellery; the gesture of committing important information to metal as a method of communicating with and for the future.

Though their scale is large, the forms that these objects assume draw their reference point back to the human body. Practices of communicating coded messages through objects displayed on the body is one that recurs in Brown’s practice. Though the hierarchy of metalworking has historically relegated jewellery to a questionably subordinate realm of artisanal craft because of its bodily use, its metaphorical language, in particular, that of charm bracelets, is historically powerful and often feminized.

Typically worn to denote or commemorate personal narratives, milestones, and rites of passage, charms are often given and received as heirlooms, and unlike other valued forms of property—such as land and currencies, which have historically been passed down a patrilinear line—charm bracelets and jewellery tend to be passed intergenerationally through the hands of women.

Moving away from these works, we are drawn toward a chorus of amphibious croaks. Slipping into the dimness of a meditatively droning bog, we encounter the hypnotic movement of clusters of objects. Undulating as if caught in a slow eddy, these elements are suspended in front of us within a romantic, semi-apocalyptic swamp. The aura here is ambiguous, though the invitation to rest and stay awhile is clear. In the gentle flow, we find organic detritus, planetary reflections, and the debris of art history which has been liberated from the museum and sunken with us into the murk. The rotation of the mobiles gestures to a cyclical sense of time, and perhaps, the cycles of life and death. We are brought in close, enveloped by colour and sound: shrouded inside of an internal space, maternal and womblike, but unclearly prenatal or posthumous.

Vanessa Brown would like to acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts and BC Arts Council.

She would also like to acknowledge and thank her studio assistants Joseph Band (metal), and Iman Hassan (textiles/robes), along with Michelle Mackenzie for her sound composition Post Meridiem for Veils of a Bog.


  Late Night Trip to the Jeweller's , 2018. Vanessa Brown. Image courtesy of John Dean.   LINK TO VIDEO HERE:    https://vimeo.com/276496661

Late Night Trip to the Jeweller's, 2018. Vanessa Brown. Image courtesy of John Dean.

LINK TO VIDEO HERE:

https://vimeo.com/276496661

THE ESKER FOUNDATION | Vimeo

Vanessa Brown: The Witching Hour
Exhibition presented at Esker Foundation, Calgary:
May 26 to September 2, 2018.

Vanessa Brown would like to acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts and BC Arts Council.

She would also like to acknowledge and thank her studio assistants Joseph Band (metal), and Iman Hassan (textiles/robes), along with Michelle Helene Mackenzie for her sound composition Post Meridiem for Veils of a Bog.

 

Works featured:
'Late Night Trip to the Jeweller’s,' 2018.

'The Greenhouse,' 2018.

Sculptures: 'Snake Gate,' 2018; 'Bottle with Ribbon', 2016; 'Ohr by the Garden Shed,' 2017; 
'Sun Milk,' 2017; 'Spring Equinox,' 2018; 'Fragonard’s Window,' 2017; 'Ivans,' 2016; 'Late Night Break,' 2017; 'Newspaper in Flight,' 2017; 'Cosmic Screen,' 2017; 'Break Ups,' 2017; 'Home in the Fall,' 2017.

'Veils of a Bog,' 2018. with Michelle Helene Mackenzie, Post Meridiem for Veils of a Bog, 2018. Multi-channel sound work, 26 minutes 24 seconds loop.

Creator: Aquiles Ascencion.
© Esker Foundation and the artists, 2018.
Music: Retro Dreamscape by Twin Musicom is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution
license (creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Source: twinmusicom.org/song/283/retro-dreamscape
Artist: twinmusicom.org

Esker Foundation
4th floor, 1011, 9th Avenue, SE, Calgary, Alberta, T2G 0H7, Canada.
eskerfoundation.art
@EskerFoundation


 Vanessa Brown,  Stained Glass Earrings + Stand , 2018. Courtesy of the artist.   LINK HERE:    http://www.localdropmag.com/featured/the-greatest-stories-ever-told-summer-at-the-esker-foundation/

Vanessa Brown, Stained Glass Earrings + Stand, 2018. Courtesy of the artist.

LINK HERE:

http://www.localdropmag.com/featured/the-greatest-stories-ever-told-summer-at-the-esker-foundation/

LOCAL DROP MAG | The Greatest Stories Ever Told 

Story by Christina Wong

A golden thread, sheets of metal, and scraps of cloth: these are the treasures you have been told lie waiting for you within the red-brick building called the Atlantic Avenue Art Block. As you approach, you are greeted by the sight of a woman working, tirelessly coiling a golden thread on the wall. She is completely focused on her work, tightly wrapping the thread into a spiral that is part of a greater set of spirals. Each spiral is a carbon copy of the other, and while it might seem as though they were manufactured by a machine, it is clear that each dot was meticulously created by the hands of an expert craftsman. Heedless of the bustle around her, she continues her work, the summer sun radiating into the glass-enclosed space. With this sight, you begin your adventure at the Esker Foundation, which has transformed and refreshed itself for the summer season.

The Project Space on the main floor now hosts a minimalist workshop, decorated with nothing more than a numerical counter, a tool cart, and the artist’s uniform. With these elements, Calgary artist Jolie Bird sets the stage for her performance-based installation, 1597; Harmonious Frequencies. Consisting of golden dots of wrapped string set in a pattern to mirror the Fibonacci Sequence, 1597; Harmonious Frequencies is an interactive piece that will be completed over the course of 12 weeks. By creating the piece through a performance, Bird gives viewers a glimpse into the intricacies and investment that goes into the creation of art. The most interesting facet of this work is that Bird wanted to activate the Project Space for a moment before letting the entire work go and leaving no trace of the installation behind.

The fourth-floor gallery space has also been stripped down to reveal an open-concept area that takes you away from the bustle of Inglewood to an airy dreamscape of larger-than-life installations. The first, Vanessa Brown’sLate Night Trip to the Jeweller’s, is a landscape of oversized objects: a sleepy clock that spans the entire height of the gallery, colourful earrings perched on a jewelry stand that could only be worn by a giantess, and two dark robes lined with jewels and plant life that would be a challenge for any mere mortal to wear. With this and all of her work in the exhibition, Vancouver-based Brown welcomes you to her storybook world, comprised of three interconnected, immersive scenes where you are asked to take the lead role in the artistic narrative.

This quality of storytelling is particularly pronounced in Brown’s Charm series of sculptures. Made of flat, painted steel planes, these figures are silhouettes of their practical equivalents, as if they were cut out of the pages of a metal storybook. Despite their construction from flat metal, each of these sculptures is given a level of dimension in their arrangement, with other shapes and figures revealing themselves as your perspective changes.  By creating these transforming objects, Brown has created a narrative that both surprises and delights as the sculpture’s true nature is revealed.

Seamlessly integrated with Brown’s dreamy, storybook reality is Anna Torma’s vibrant  narrative in textile art. A series of hand embroidery and textile collage, Torma’s  installation is a chaotic collision of collective memory. On display are works inspired by her children’s drawings, pieces from collaborations with family, and remnants from past projects that come together to create stories that are both foreign and familiar. Complex, anatomical diagrams are presented with words spelt backwards, fire breathing dragons dance alongside wolves with human heads, and roaring bears are mixed with words in Hungarian, and it’s these collected landscapes that give insight to that delicate balance between preserving history and creating progress.

The most captivating of these pieces is Carpet of Many Hands, a textile collage of found fabrics from domestic linens, printed pieces, and decorative samples. Spanning two panels that drape along the floor, Carpet of Many Hands is an ode to the small things that are often cast off because of their seemingly inconsequential nature.  Pastoral images are captioned with comic book speech bubbles while lace panels partially obscure tribal-like drawings, and while each of the fabric pieces may not be very impressive on their own, together they create a powerful story of love, social norms, and life as an immigrant in Canada. Through this colourful and larger than life installation, Torma reminds us that it is not a thing, a phrase, or an image that matters, but the interconnectivity of these things that makes for an interesting story.

In that sense, the Esker Foundation’s Summer 2018 Exhibitions are an ode to the stories that make up life itself and a chance to see ourselves as the creators and keepers of our own story. We are questioned through Brown’s work about what type of protagonist we are and what perspectives we take on our challenges. We are shown through Torma’s work that no story is complete without all of the details and to value all of the little things. We are reminded through Bird’s work that despite the beauty and the effort that is put in to create something meaningful, it will one day be stripped away. If all that remains are our stories, then this summer’s exhibitions at the Esker Foundation are a fantastic example of how we must honour those stories, no matter how insignificant the details or fantastic the outcomes.


 The Almanacs. CJSW. Thursdays 7-10am    LISTEN HERE:    http://cjsw.com/program/the-almanacs/podcast/20180517/

The Almanacs. CJSW. Thursdays 7-10am 

LISTEN HERE:

http://cjsw.com/program/the-almanacs/podcast/20180517/

The Almanacs | 90.9FM CJSW

May 17, 2018

INTERVIEW: Esker curator, Shauna Thompson with a preview of the summer exhibitions Vanessa Brown, Anna Torma, And Jolie Bird, opening at the Esker Foundation on Friday, May 25th 2018.

http://cjsw.com/program/the-almanacs/podcast/20180517/


 Anna Torma,  Abandoned Details I , 2018. Appliquéd found objects and hand embroidery on two layers of linen fabrics, silk threads. Courtesy of the artist.   LINK HERE:    https://www.e-flux.com/announcements/176055/summer-exhibitions-vanessa-brown-anna-torma-and-jolie-bird/

Anna Torma, Abandoned Details I, 2018. Appliquéd found objects and hand embroidery on two layers of linen fabrics, silk threads. Courtesy of the artist.

LINK HERE:

https://www.e-flux.com/announcements/176055/summer-exhibitions-vanessa-brown-anna-torma-and-jolie-bird/

E-FLUX | The Esker Foundation - Summer Exhibitions: Vanessa Brown, Anna Torma and Jolie Bird

May 26–September 2, 2018

Opening: May 25, 6–10pm
Talk with Anna Torma: May 26, 1–2pm
Talk with Jolie Bird: June 15, 7–8pm
Talk with Vanessa Brown: June 22, 7–8pm

Esker Foundation 
4th floor, 1011 9th Avenue, SE
Calgary Alberta T2G 0H7
Canada
Hours: Tuesday–Sunday 11am–6pm,
Friday 11am–8pm

T +1 403 930 2490
info@eskerfoundation.com 


 Katherine Boyer’s  Rug  (2016) is part of the Métis art survey “Li Salay” opening at the Art Gallery of Alberta. The work is comprised of found fabric, string, yarn and seed beads. Collection of the artist. Image courtesy of the artist.   LINK HERE:    https://canadianart.ca/must-sees/must-sees-week-may-24-30-2018/ 

Katherine Boyer’s Rug (2016) is part of the Métis art survey “Li Salay” opening at the Art Gallery of Alberta. The work is comprised of found fabric, string, yarn and seed beads. Collection of the artist. Image courtesy of the artist.

LINK HERE:

https://canadianart.ca/must-sees/must-sees-week-may-24-30-2018/ 

CANADIAN ART | Must-Sees This Week: May 24 to 30, 2018

A Métis art survey in Edmonton, a landmark Rafael Lozano-Hemmer show in Montreal, and a Feminist Land Art Retreat foray in Vancouver all make the list

MAY 24, 2018

BY CANADIAN ART

Lots of great art exhibitions and events are taking place across the country this week. Here are our recommendations for debuting shows and events, and a few reminders about shows that are closing. Visit our Exhibition Finder for more listings of worthwhile shows that are already open.

EDMONTON

The new exhibition “Li Salay” opens at the Art Gallery of Alberta on May 25. Co-curated by Amy Malbeuf and Jessie Ray Short, the show celebrates the work of Métis artists across Canada and considers the boundaries of Métis artistic practice. Developed from extensive cross-country research by the curators over the past two years, this group show features artists Lori Blondeau, Katherine Boyer, Dayna Danger, Rosalie Favell, Gabrielle L’Hirondelle Hill, Casey Koyczan, Tim Moore, Audie Murray, Sheri Nault, Sherry Farrell Racette, Les Ramsay, Jewel Shaw and Amanda Strong.

To coincide with the exhibition launch, a two-day symposium will take place on May 25 and 26 at the gallery to foster dialogue around issues surrounding the exhibition.

Elsewhere, paintings by Jonathan Forrest debut in “Colour Coherence” on May 24 at Peter Robertson Gallery. A reception will be held from 7 to 9 p.m.

MONTREAL

The Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal unveils work by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer on May 24. Known for his large-scale installations and innovative use of technology, his work will be surveyed over the past decade and will consider its poetic and political implications—highlighting the artist’s continuous emphasis on relationality and “co-presence.”

Meanwhile, Art45 launches the photography show “Hidden Stories” on May 25, which tackles questions of space, place and urbanity. The five featured artists are Benoit Aquin, Claude-Philippe Benoit, Angela Grauerholz, Karina Nimmerfall and Sylvie Readman.

The Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery presents the video installation Le retrait (2018) by artist Olivia Boudreau off-site at 5445 Gaspé Avenue from May 29 to June 9. On May 30, the solo show “Vuja de” by Gianni Giuliano opens at Galerie Erga, while Galerie D’Este presents a solo feature of engravings by Ludmila Armata in “Field Walk Works.”

To mark the end of her residency at the Darling Foundry, Argentinian curator Renata Cervetto will give a presentation about her work and time spent in Montreal on May 24 at 6 p.m.

In closings, Nadia Myre‘s “Tout Ce Qui Reste – Scattered Remains” ends on May 27 at the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal.

VANCOUVER AND AREA

Work by Aleesa Cohene launches at Western Front in “I Don’t Get It” on May 24. Showcasing a new body of work by the artist, this show takes race, constructions of identity and the role of images as its primary focus. Using movie footage as a medium, Cohene critically reviews whiteness as portrayed in white Hollywood cinema.

Feminist Land Art Retreat’s latest exhibition “Free Rein” opens at the Audain Gallery with a reception and artist talk on May 30 at 7 p.m. Curated by Amy Kazymerchyk, the show will present FLAR’s video work No Man’s Land—which makes reference to the western genre, gendered work, earth art as well as colonial allegories—and their new work Transmissions on the outdoor Pattison billboard.

Over at Griffin Art Projects, “zero, ground” debuts on May 26—a group exhibition that collectively explores the potentials of darkness. Works by artists Tacita Dean, Stan Douglas, Rodney Graham, Antonia Hirsch, Kathy Slade, Wolfgang Tillmans, Andy Warhol and Beate Terfloth, among others, will be featured. Terfloth will give an artist talk on opening day at 2 p.m., which will be followed by a reception from 3 to 5 p.m.

Meanwhile, Equinox Gallery presents the group show “Works on Paper” on May 26, featuring artists Sonny Assu, Renée Van Halm and Etienne Zack. Also opening at the gallery are new paintings by Gathie Falk in the solo show “The Things We Grow.”

Presented by 221A, a double-feature screening of two films by Casey WeiMurky Colors(2013) and Vater und Sohn/Father and Son/父与子 (2014)—will show at the Cinematheque on May 27 from 2 to 5 p.m.

In New Westminster at the New Media Gallery, artist Carol Sawyer will respond to the centre’s current exhibition “TRACE” as part of an experimental response series.

TORONTO

A new show about Rita Letendre’s public art debuts at YYZ Artists’ Outlet on May 25. Organized by Adam Lauder, “Toronto Public Art” will look at the legacy of the murals and large-scale paintings Letendre executed in Toronto when she relocated to the city in 1970. Down the hall and in link with Trevor Paglen’s current exhibition “Surveillance States,” Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art hosts a screening of Spiral Jetty (1970) by land artistRobert Smithson on May 26 at 2 p.m.

Curator Ryan Rice presents the guest lecture “How Many Times Do I Have To Tell You?” at Ryerson University’s School of Image Arts on May 30 at 7 p.m. In this talk, Rice will discuss elements of his work and career in link with Indigenous presence in contemporary art. Meanwhile, OCAD University hosts the panel discussion “STANCE: The possible role of design & designers” with design leaders Luigi Ferrara and Dori Tunstall, moderated byRodrigo Barreda, on May 30 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The panel is part of the programming for the current exhibition “STANCE: Design Against Fascism” at Sur Gallery, and will explore the role of design in political and economic contexts.

The annual ReelAbilities Film Festival: Toronto kicks off on May 29, showcasing international films about Deaf and disability cultures. Twenty-five films will be presented across different venues in the city until June 4. Workman Arts simultaneously presents the symposium “#BigFeels: Creating Space for Mental Health in the Arts” from May 28 to 30. This event will query ways to better support artists with lived experiences in mental health through panel discussions, workshops and one-on-one conversations. An opening reception will take place on May 28 at Artscape Youngplace, with the remainder of the event unfolding at Artscape Wychwood Barns.

Meanwhile, Erin Stump Projects presents two new shows on May 25: “An Ear in a Pond” by Katie Lyle and “Where is the Compass” by Anna-Sophia Vukovich. Over at Loop Gallery, two other shows debut later on May 26: John Ide’s “What Paper Remembers” andAdrienne Trent’s “The Nature of Reality and the Reality of Nature.” Elsewhere, new work by Kristiina Lahde debuts in “Out of Line” at MKG127 on May 26, furthering the artist’s engagement with found materials.

Over at the Art Gallery of Ontario, Arthur Jafa will give a talk about his practice on May 30 at 7 p.m. as part of the CONTACT International Photography talks series.

In closings: “Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors” at the AGO, the group show “Weight of Light” at the Art Museum and Lorna Bauer’s “The Hand of Mee” at Franz Kaka all wrap this week.

PETERBOROUGH

Artspace launches the show “future generations” by Tsēmā Igharas on May 25 with a reception from 7 to 10 p.m. In this show, Igharas premises methods of care and resistance in link with Indigenous futurity. The following day on May 26, the artist will lead a free bead-making workshop from 1 to 3 p.m.

WINNIPEG

The travelling exhibition “SakKijâjuk: Art and Craft from Nunatsiavut,” curated by Heather Igloliorte, launches at the Winnipeg Art Gallery on May 25. Featuring 47 artists, this landmark exhibition celebrates the art of Labrador Inuit. The next day on May 26, Igloliorte will lead a tour of the exhibition and give a talk at 2 p.m.

Meanwhile at PLATFORM Centre, the solo show “If You Have a Similar Story Keep it to Yourself” by performance and video artist Bridget Moser also opens on May 25, with a reception at 7 p.m. Moser will give an artist talk about her practice the following day on May 26 at 1 p.m.

Co-hosted with Urban Shaman Gallery, Martha Street Studio presents an artist talk withJamison Chās Banks on May 26 at 2 p.m. The artist will discuss his practice, specifically his printmaking, in link with the upcoming exhibition “Crypsis: Eradication Methods Laboratory” opening at Urban Shaman on June 1.

CALGARY

The New Gallery debuts the group show “bust/boom” on May 25. Curated by Noa Bronstein and Deborah Wang, this exhibition will explore the representation of economic cycles, and features artists Richard Ibghy and Marilou Lemmens, Gabrielle L’Hirondelle Hill, An Te Liu, Gordon Matta-Clark and Hwayeon Nam.

Elsewhere, two new shows kick off at the Esker Foundation on this same day: Vanessa Brown’s “The Witching Hour” and Anna Torma’s “Book of Abandoned Details.” A reception for both shows will be held from 6 to 10 p.m. on opening day. Meanwhile, Jolie Bird’s performance-based installation 1597Harmonious Frequencies continues its showing in the centre’s Project Space.

Artist Ron Moppett will give a talk about his latest work in link with the current exhibition “Tarps & Ties” at TrépanierBaer Gallery, on May 26 at 2:30 p.m.

OTTAWA

Artist Catherine Richards will perform the first iteration of the participatory performanceShroud/Chrysalis I at the Ottawa Art Gallery on May 26 from 1 to 4 p.m. Participants are invited to partake in the work and renegotiate their relationships with technology.

Over at Gallery 101, Tania Price will lead the “Finger croknit Improv Carpets” workshop on May 30 from 7 to 9 p.m., where participants will be invited to experiment with textile materials and different techniques.

MOOSE JAW

The Moose Jaw Museum and Art Gallery launches two new exhibitions on May 25. “Arbor Vitae” will feature ceramic installations by Winnipeg artist Grace Nickel, while the group show “Vessel” will showcase ceramic works by Saskatchewan artists from the centre’s collection.

SASKATOON

Artist Peter Morin gives a talk about his practice at AKA artist-run on May 29 at 7 p.m

MEDICINE HAT

The Art Gallery of the Esplanade Arts and Heritage Centre presents two exhibitions this week: “Alberta and the Group of Seven” and “Jude Griebel Ground-Figure: Sculptures 2013-2018.” Both shows are part of the Medicine Hat Art Walk circuit on May 25, which commences at 7 p.m.

ST. CATHARINES

The Rodman Hall Art Centre presents the group show “Carry Forward” this week. Curated byLisa Myers and organized by the Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery, this exhibition looks at the troubled history of documentation and what counts as a public record. Participating artists include Deanna Bowen, Dana Claxton, Marjorie Beaucage, Maika’i Tubbs, Nadia Myre and more. An opening reception will be held on May 24 at 7 p.m., including an exhibition tour with curator Myers at 7:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN’S

Meryl McMaster: Confluence” opens at the Rooms Provincial Art Gallery on May 26. Curated by Heather Anderson, this photography-based travelling exhibition will display artworks from three different series by the artist.

Over at Christina Parker Gallery, “The Impression of Something Real” will showcase new paintings by Mike Gough. The show launches on May 25 with a reception at 5:30 p.m.

HALIFAX

The MSVU Art Gallery launches the group show “Material Remains” on May 26, curated by Ingrid Jenkner. The various textile works assembled will consider the associations of these materials with gender politics and connotations of domesticity.


 Stained Glass Earrings + Stand, 2018. Vanessa Brown   LINK HERE:    https://eskerfoundation.com/exhibition/vanessabrown/

Stained Glass Earrings + Stand, 2018. Vanessa Brown

LINK HERE:

https://eskerfoundation.com/exhibition/vanessabrown/

THE ESKER FOUNDATION: Upcoming Exhibitions | Vanessa Brown: The Witching Hour 

May 26 – September 2, 2018

In the witching hour you’re alone, moving through a wet forest, a bog, a bayou – all heavy shadows, furtive shimmers and iridescence. An enchanted painting. You are not afraid, surrounded by a coven of symbols, a humidity of forms; there is magic in the murk, in the meaty croak and full-throated drone of an army of frogs, a knot of toads. You are attuned to the emotional kinship among objects, to the possibility of a midnight emergence. The stage is set; a bewitched scenography poised in the moment before an action. In this tactile sensory environment, life is pliable, contingent. The latent potential of a tableau of forms whispers to you a complicated narrative. Objects could come alive in the middle of the night; there could be life in inanimate things.

Vanessa Brown works in the space between strength and fragility through an alchemical fusing of steel, pigment, and glass – sculpture flirting with painting, a symbolic narrative collage, form as gesture or character. This exhibition brings together new installations and recent works, ranging in scale from grand to intimate. It is a proposal in material, colour, light, and sound; a coming-into-being, an invitation into an emotively charmed circle.


 Image: Vanessa Brown's studio.   LINK TO PODCAST HERE:    http://www.overlydedicatedpodcast.ca/e/episode-4-vanessa-brown/

Image: Vanessa Brown's studio.

LINK TO PODCAST HERE:

http://www.overlydedicatedpodcast.ca/e/episode-4-vanessa-brown/

OVERLY DEDICATED PODCAST | Episode 4: Vanessa Brown 


Hosted by Claire Scherzinger
March 19th 2018

Vanessa Brown and I discuss why you shouldn't have to have an MFA to make it in this world, snakes and symbology, as well as her exciting upcoming show at the Esker Foundation.

Photo Credits: Vanessa Brown, Mike Bourscheid, other images retrieved from https://www.vanessa-brown.com/

Music Credits: Emily Scherzinger, intro and outro music; sample taken from Sigur Ros, "Saeglopur."


 Image:  Marianne  (detail, tea infuser), 2017. Vanessa Brown.   LINK HERE:    https://frieze.com/event/vanessa-brown

Image: Marianne (detail, tea infuser), 2017. Vanessa Brown.

LINK HERE:

https://frieze.com/event/vanessa-brown

FRIEZE.COM | Esker Foundation 

UPCOMING EXHIBITION

26 MAY – 2 SEPTEMBER
OPENING RECEPTION: FRIDAY 25 MAY, 6–10PM

VANESSA BROWN

In the witching hour you’re alone, moving through a wet forest, a bog, a bayou – all heavy shadows, furtive shimmers and iridescence. An enchanted painting. You are not afraid, surrounded by a coven of symbols, a humidity of forms; there is magic in the murk, in the meaty croak and full-throated drone of an army of frogs, a knot of toads.

You are attuned to the emotional kinship among objects, to the possibility of a midnight emergence. The stage is set; a bewitched scenography poised in the moment before an action. In this tactile sensory environment, life is pliable, contingent. The latent potential of a tableau of forms whispers to you a complicated narrative. Objects could come alive in the middle of the night; there could be life in inanimate things.

Vanessa Brown works in the space between strength and fragility through an alchemical fusing of steel, pigment, and glass – sculpture irting with painting, a symbolic narrative collage, form as gesture or character. This exhibition brings together new installations and recent works, ranging in scale from grand to intimate. It is a proposal in material, colour, light, and sound; a coming-into-being, an invitation into an emotively charmed circle.

BIOGRAPHY

Vanessa Brown works in sculpture, painting, and photography. Her primary medium is steel and she attempts to parse its associations with industry, weaponry, and brutality, and its subtler qualities such as pliability, versatility, and slightness. The imagery in her work draws from various sources including landscapes, historical crafts, recurring symbols from her own dreams, as well as the work and biographies of other female artists. She is based in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish Territories. Brown graduated with a BFA from Emily Carr University, Vancouver in 2013 and was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award. She has exhibited in Canada, Germany, the USA, and Mexico, notably with solo and two- person exhibitions at Wil Aballe Art Projects, Vancouver; Erin Stump Projects, Toronto; and group exhibitions at the Nanaimo Art Gallery; Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin; and King Street Station, Seattle. 


 Image:  Schleusenkrug Biergarten , 2017. Vanessa Brown. For NUT II, edited by Liza Lacroix + Alli Melanson, published by Anteism   LINK HERE:    https://www.nutpublication.com/

Image: Schleusenkrug Biergarten, 2017. Vanessa Brown. For NUT II, edited by Liza Lacroix + Alli Melanson, published by Anteism

LINK HERE:

https://www.nutpublication.com/

NUT II |A.I.R. Gallery, NY

NUT II Book Launch
March 24th, 2018 4-6P
at A.I.R. Gallery (155 Plymouth St, Brooklyn, NY)

Please join us at 4pm on March 24th, at the historic A.I.R. Gallery for the launch of "NUT II."

"NUT" is an all women’s publication devoted to celebrating and fostering the female artist community. The project takes its name from the Egyptian sky Goddess who, every night, swallows the sun and births it anew, performing the perpetual cycle of life and death. The impetus for "NUT" was a desire to harness personal traumas into positive outcomes as a process of healing and renewal.

Our goal is twofold: first to give form to a beautiful collection of great art made by women, and second, as a means of raising funds to support women globally. All proceeds generated by "NUT" are donated to the Global Fund for Women, an international organization whose mission is to “find, fund, and amplify the courageous work of women who are building social movements and challenging the status quo.” 

More info: www.globalfundforwomen.org

The book’s 5 x 7 in. format features a collection of 64 detachable high-quality prints of works on paper by women artists. A limited edition will be available for purchase at the launch and subsequently viawww.nutpublication.com and www.anteism.com.

For more information please email nutlaunch@gmail.com


 Image:  Penumbra , 2017. Vanessa Brown. Installed here at the Nanaimo Art Gallery. Currently included in a group show at The Drake Hotel.   LINK HERE:    http://www.thedrakehotel.ca/culture/different-my-mind/

Image: Penumbra, 2017. Vanessa Brown. Installed here at the Nanaimo Art Gallery. Currently included in a group show at The Drake Hotel.

LINK HERE:

http://www.thedrakehotel.ca/culture/different-my-mind/

THE DRAKE HOTEL | Different In My Mind 

DIFFERENT IN MY MIND
The Drake Hotel
March 1, 2018 - Aug. 28, 2018

Curated by Mia Nielson

Vanessa Brown, Daniel Gordon, Mark Dudiak, Alison Postma, Caroline Larsen

What is still life and what is still alive? Working in the shadows of reality, these five artists harness spiritual realms and colours that pop. The collection of work turns flowers, bricks, bottles and cups into mystic objects beyond the surface. 

Penumbra is a recent work by Vancouver-based sculptor Vanessa Brown. Inspired by the late Salt Spring Island potter Lari Robson, this steel mobile is about the ripple effect of life and how we impact each other, even after death. 

Brooklyn’s Daniel Gordon begins his process by creating still lifes from paper. Then, he photographs the psychedelic scene and digitally manipulates it before printing the final product on canvas. Artichokes and Potatoes is set against a vinyl backdrop developed by the artist that further blurs the line between real and unreal. 

The structural frames that house Montreal artist Mark Dudiak’s Aura paintings add an architectural element to images of ivy leaves that are repeated to the point of abstraction. It’s a shrine to memories and transcendental experiences—elevating the importance of objects in our post-internet world. 

Caroline Larsen’s Hanging Basket and Tropical Night trick eyes into thinking that these oil paintings are stitched textiles. They bring the viewer deeper into the image with intricate patterns and vibrant colours. Currently based in Brooklyn, her work has been exhibited in Toronto, Santa Monica, Chicago, Tel Aviv, New York and more. 

Alison Postma, a Toronto-based photographer, is interested in turning real spaces into flat images. Her structural set-ups use juxtaposing textures and colours, that become a single entity in the final product. Combining flat and sculptural elements into a cohesive image.


 Image:   VANESSA BROWN   ARTIST  VANCOUVER December 20, 2017   LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:    http://www.akimbo.ca/hitlist/?id=448

Image: 
VANESSA BROWN
ARTIST
VANCOUVER
December 20, 2017

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:

http://www.akimbo.ca/hitlist/?id=448

AKIMBO | Hit List: Vanessa Brown

 

1. M2M.tv

 Rei Kawakubo in  Antifashion

Rei Kawakubo in Antifashion

M2M stands for Made to Measure and it is a website that acts as an online fashion channel where you can find runway shows as they are released each season along with interviews and documentaries. I recommend the film Antifashion, which looks at the turn in mood of fashion design that took place in the 1990s and includes interviews with Rei Kawakubo, Yohji Yamamoto, and Ann Demeulemeester. Or try any documentary by Loic Prigent, who spends as much or more time focusing on the talent of the individuals who labour under the name of a fashion house as he does with its principle designer. Signe Chanel, for example.

 

2. Chu Hua Catherine Dong

 Chun Hua Catherine Dong,  I have been there – Paris , 2017 (photo: Ian Fenelon)

Chun Hua Catherine Dong, I have been there – Paris, 2017 (photo: Ian Fenelon)

Although I have been following her practice, I haven’t seen a live performance by Chun Hua Catherine Dong since we were in art school together. While so many of us were carefully planting obscure art historical references in our abstract paintings and provisional sculptures, Dong’s brazen performances were radical, gutsy, and sincere. Her approach was virtually peerless at the time. You can only imagine how excited I am to continue to see her work unfold.

 

3. Planet Money: The Holiday Industrial Complex

 #NationalCaramelDay. AJ Mast/Invision for Werther's Original via AP  

#NationalCaramelDay. AJ Mast/Invision for Werther's Original via AP
 

I listened to this episode in the summer and I’m still thinking about it. Wine Day is May 25th, National Cheese Day is June 4th, and National Splurge Day (can you believe it??) is June 18th. It seems like just about any day is a national holiday urging us to open our wallets and spend, spend, spend. What is powering this holiday-making machine? This podcast looks at the origins of this phenomenon and presents something I found so unexpected, generous, and caring that I cried. (PS I find this podcast fascinating, so it makes it hard to pick just one episode.)

 

4. Concerning the Bodyguard

VanessaBrown_Barthelme1.jpg

A story by Donald Barthelme told almost entirely as a series of questions. Not only is the narrative expertly derived from this format, but the technique of using questions as a form of narrative places the reader in a position of constant uncertainty, mimicking that of a bodyguard whose professional success is ever dependent on the non-event. Concerning the Bodyguard also relates to a larger concern I have around working in various fields: When it comes to getting a job done, whose body is on the line? There is a link to the story here. Salman Rushdie reads it beautifully and discusses it with New Yorker’s fiction editor Deborah Treisman in a podcast here.

 

5. Kim's Convenience

VanessaBrown_KimsConvenience.jpg

I just love this show. I went stomping around Toronto trying to find the storefront location when I was in town for a few days only to be told by locals that it didn’t exist. Of course, as soon as I left town I found out that it did exist after all. Anyway, I haven’t seen the play, but the TV show is so cozy and warm, and I look forward to it every week. It is hilarious and occasionally a bit of a tearjerker. Plus, they have the best fan engagement on Facebook. You can watch it here.


Vanessa Brown works in sculpture, painting, and photography. She is based in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish Territories. She graduated with a BFA from Emily Carr University in 2013 and was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award. She has exhibited in Canada, Germany, the USA, and Mexico, notably with solo and two-person exhibitions at Wil Aballe Art Projects in Vancouver, Erin Stump Projects in Toronto, and group exhibitions at the Nanaimo Art Gallery, Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin, and King Street Station in Seattle. She has an upcoming solo exhibition at the Esker Foundation in the spring of 2018 and is currently in the group exhibition Some Spontaneous Particulars at Access Gallery.


 Image: Pierre Chaumont’s  AVE CALIGULA (Madness Is Always Rewarded)  (2016). Photo: Courtesy of the artist.   LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:     http://canadianart.ca/must-sees/must-sees-this-week-december-7-to-13-2017/

Image: Pierre Chaumont’s AVE CALIGULA (Madness Is Always Rewarded) (2016). Photo: Courtesy of the artist.

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE: 

http://canadianart.ca/must-sees/must-sees-this-week-december-7-to-13-2017/

CANADIAN ART | Must-Sees This Week: Dec 7th - 13th, 2017

DECEMBER 7, 2017
BY CANADIAN ART

Lots of great art exhibitions and events are taking place across the country this week. Here are our recommendations for debuting shows and events, and a few reminders about shows that are closing. Visit our Exhibition Finder for more listings of worthwhile shows that are already open.

MONTREAL

The exhibition “D’où viens-tu? [Where are you from?]” with Pierre Chaumont, Dayna Danger and Chun Hua Catherine Dong opens at Art Mûr this week. Curated by Collectif 13—a group of UQAM art history students led by curator and lecturer Véronique Leblanc—the exhibition debuts on December 7 at 5:30 p.m. Engaging the body as political and historical territory, the three artists contest representations of women, sexuality and culture through their respective practices. Using photography, installation and performance, Chaumont, Danger and Dong address the power relations that shape representations of the Other—specifically colonialism, patriarchy and heteronormativity—allowing for new conceptualizations to come forth. Performances by Danger and Dong will take place on December 9 at 2:30 p.m.

Over at the Darling Foundry, a conversation between current artists-in-residenceLaurianne Bixhain and Aqui Thami will be presented on December 7 at 6 p.m. Both artists will discuss the research and work they have been undertaking while on residency. Meanwhile at Galerie AVE, the group exhibition “Faux Éveil / False Awakening” opens on December 7 with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Together, the works play on the idea of different realities, fluctuating between dreaming and waking states.

Meanwhile at SBC Gallery of Contemporary Art, Ashon Crawley will present the performative lecture “The Lonely Letters: On the Hammond B-3 Sense and Sound Experience” on December 9 from 3 to 5 p.m. Crawley will employ what he calls Blackpentecostal noise-making practices to explore the connections between quantum theory, mysticism and Blackness.

VANCOUVER AND AREA

On December 8, the Cinematheque presents a free screening of Two Generators (1984), an early film work by Vancouver-based artist and musician Rodney Graham, as part of the “Canada on Screen” program. The event launches at 7 p.m., and Graham will be in attendance to introduce the screening.

Over at Access Gallery, the exhibition “Some Spontaneous Particulars” opens December 8 at 7 p.m., featuring Vanessa Brown, Heide Hinrichs and Kathleen Ritter. Curated by Kimberly Phillips, the exhibition presents works by the artists that have never been exhibited, collectively bringing into focus questions of material traces and feminist archiving. Phillips and the artists will convene the following day for a discussion and launch of the publication accompanying the exhibition at 2 p.m. At Wil Aballe Art Projects, join Marina Roy in conversation with writer, artist and educator Randy Lee Cutler and artist Ingrid Koenig on December 9 at 2 p.m. The talk is in conjunction with Roy’s current exhibition “Dirty Clouds,” on view at WAAP until December 16.

Oraf Orafsson will be performing his new work Burnt Offering at Griffin Art Projects on December 9 at 8 p.m., as part of the programming for the current exhibition “Civilization” byPaul P. Later on December 13, Western Front hosts the next “Text to Speech” media reading group at 7 p.m., presented by the centre’s current artist-in-residence and sound-based researcher Elisa Ferrari. Salomé Voegelin’s text Listening to Noise and Silence: Towards a Philosophy of Sound Art as well as works by poets Peter Culley and Maxine Gadd will be the focus of this session.

In closings: this is the last week to catch Tristan Unrau‘s solo exhibition at UNIT 17’s new exhibition space on West 4th Avenue, on until December 9. Russell Leng’s “Temporary Tunnels” at FIELD Contemporary also wraps on December 9.

KAMLOOPS

As a response to the exhibition “Since Then” currently on view at the Kamloops Art Gallery,Tania Willard has curated “Over the Horizon of Tomorrow”—a series of performances by leading international contemporary Indigenous performance artists. The performance series examines notions of non-binary gender, ancestral legacies, colonial violence and time travel, looking at how cultural translation takes form on Indigenous lands.

Peter Morin will be performing the last iteration of the series on December 9 from 2 to 3 p.m. Morin’s work Experiments with Time Travel is part of “Since Then,” and the artist will be activating the installation by inviting audience members to participate in a performance that centres the piece.

TORONTO AND AREA

The exhibition “Vacancies” featuring works by Abbas Akhavan, Sameer Farooq andJoshua Vettivelu debuts at Towards Gallery on December 7, continuing until January 6. All three artists explore issues of representation and how historical narratives, both personal and public, are scripted. Meanwhile at Sur Gallery, the group exhibition “Roots (Raíces)” by six Latinx youth artists launches on December 7 from 6 to 11 p.m.

Over at Barbara Edwards Contemporary, the gallery will present its first solo exhibition ofRobert Youds’s work, opening on December 8 with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. The artist’s vibrant and cross-disciplinary work fragments and puts into question perceptual boundaries. Elsewhere, at Y+ Contemporary, an opening reception for “When you touch one thing, you have to touch all things” by the collective SADSADDERDAZE—composed ofEmma Green, Alison Postma, Elana Shvalbe and Emma Welch—will be held on December 9 from 6 to 11 p.m. The exhibition continues until December 15.

In closings, the last day to catch the 2017 Sobey Art Award exhibition at the Art Museum at the University of Toronto is December 9, featuring the work of finalists Raymond Boisjoly, Divya Mehra, Bridget Moser and Jacynthe Carrier, as well as of Sobey Art Award winnerUrsula Johnson. This is also the last week to see “raise a flag: works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000-2015),” on view at Onsite Gallery until December 10. Same for “Every. Now. Then.” at the AGO—it closes December 10.

HAMILTON

The exhibition “Generalists Die In Bed” opens at the Assembly on December 8, with a reception from 7 to 10 p.m. The group exhibition will feature works that respectively represent turning points for each of the artists, while speaking to the rewarding yet simultaneously futile pursuit of knowledge.

EDMONTON

Scott Plear’s exhibition of abstract paintings “Radioactive Core” debuts at Bugera Matheson Gallery on December 8, running until December 24. A reception will be held on opening night from 6 to 9 p.m., followed by an artist talk the next day at 1 p.m.

LETHBRIDGE

Two new exhibitions open at the Southern Alberta Art Gallery on December 9 at 8 p.m.: “a slow light” by Tyler Los-Jones and “The Golden USB” by Richard Ibghy and Marilou Lemmens. For Jones, the work takes its cue from landmarks that humans use to navigate the landscape and relate to nature, particularly those found in the area of Crowsnest Pass. Ibghy and Lemmens’ project imagines how capitalism will expand from the present moment. Encoded within their golden USB is the Trade Catalog of Everything, a digital file cataloguing all commodities on Earth.

FREDERICTON

The Beaverbrook Art Gallery hosts architect Talbot Sweetapple‘s presentation “Designing the pavilion: An architectural exploration of the process and product” on December 7, where Sweetapple will discuss the architecture and philosophy behind the new pavilion at the gallery. This free event is open to all, and launches at 8 p.m.

OTTAWA

The Canada Council’s Âjagemô Gallery presents Katherine Boyer’s “To Bead is To Visit” from December 7 to January 2. Part exhibition, part residency, Boyer’s work will use a traditional style of Métis beading, which will develop during the month as the public will be invited to bead alongside the artist. A guided tour with Boyer will be held on December 13 from 12 to 1 p.m.

WINNIPEG

Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art hosts a curatorial tour of the exhibition “Entering the Landscape” with Jenifer Papararo on December 9 at 3 p.m. The exhibition continues until December 31.

CALGARY

This is the last week to view Jade Yumang’s “Thumb Through” at TRUCK Contemporary Art, which wraps on December 9.

These must-sees are selected from submissions and press releases sent to preview@canadianart.ca at least two days prior to publication. Listings can be found at canadianart.ca/exhibitions.


 Image:  Kathleen Ritter, MinaLoy, serigraph on Magnani Pescia paper. 56x76cm, 2014. Photo by Paul Litherland.   LINK HERE:    http://accessgallery.ca/exhibitions/somespontaneousparticularsexhibit/

Image:  Kathleen Ritter, MinaLoy, serigraph on Magnani Pescia paper. 56x76cm, 2014. Photo by Paul Litherland.

LINK HERE:

http://accessgallery.ca/exhibitions/somespontaneousparticularsexhibit/

ACCESS GALLERY | Some Spontaneous Particulars: Vanessa Brown, Heide Hinrichs, Kathleen Ritter

Exhibition Dates: December 9, 2017 – January 20, 2018
Opening Reception & Publication Launch
Friday, December 8, 2017, 7:00 PM
In Conversation: Vanessa Brown, Heide Hinrichs, and Kathleen Ritter with Kimberly Phillips
Saturday, December 9, 2017, 2:00 PM

Some Spontaneous Particulars takes as its departure point a phrase in American poet Susan Howe’s book-length poem Spontaneous Particulars: The Telepathy of Archives(2014):

Often by chance, via out-of-the-way card catalogues, or through previous web surfing, a particular “deep” text, or a simple object […] reveals itself here at the surface of the visible, by mystic documentary telepathy. Quickly–precariously–coming as it does from an opposite direction. If you are lucky, you may experience a moment before.

This exhibition presents never-before exhibited work by three artists whose research-based practices have drawn them to the work of historical women artists Marianne Brandt (for Brown), Theresa Hak Kyung Cha (for Hinrichs) and Mina Loy (for Ritter), whose own production and memory has been overlooked or stifled within the art historical canon. Presented in dialogue with Beginning with the Seventies: Activism, Art and Archives, a multi-year project initiated at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery and curated by Lorna Brown, the object-based works in Some Spontaneous Particulars demonstrate particular concern for a material handling of the past, as a means to query the act and implications of retrieval, the ethics of translation, and consider the radical potential of a feminist archive.

Curated by Kimberly Phillips

Vanessa Brown is a sculptor who works primarily in steel. She attempts to parse its associations with industry, weaponry and brutality from its subtler qualities such as pliability, versatility and slightness. The imagery in her work draws from various sources including landscapes, historical crafts, recurring symbols from her own dreams, as well as the work and biographies of other female artists. She is based in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish Territories. Brown graduated with a BFA from Emily Carr University in 2013 and was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award. She has exhibited in Canada, Germany, the USA, and Mexico.

Heide Hinrichs works balance ambiguity and contradiction, telling stories of past emotions, mental states and gestures. In this process she often develops a sculptural language that is structured by the semantic exploration of everyday objects and found materials. Recent exhibitions include red offering (Lovenjoel, Belgium),  The Event of the Thread (Dresden,Germany), Kathmandu Triennial (Nepal) and Heidelberger Kunstverein (Germany). Born in Germany, Hinrichs lives and works in Brussels.

Kathleen Ritter is an artist based in Paris. She was an artist in residence at La Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris, in 2013. Her art practice broadly explores questions of visibility, especially in relation to systems of power, language and technology. Recent solo exhibitions took place at G Gallery, Toronto, and Battat Contemporary, Montréal, both in 2014. In addition Ritter has organized exhibitions in Canada and abroad. Her writing on contemporary art has appeared in ESSE, Prefix Photo, and Fillip as well as in numerous catalogues.


 Image: The Far Off Blue Places (Install) Anjuli Rathod + Vanessa Brown  LINK TO FEATURE HERE:   http://artviewer.org/anjuli-rathod-and-vanessa-brown-at-projet-pangee/

Image: The Far Off Blue Places (Install) Anjuli Rathod + Vanessa Brown

LINK TO FEATURE HERE:

http://artviewer.org/anjuli-rathod-and-vanessa-brown-at-projet-pangee/

ART VIEWER | Anjuli Rathod and Vanessa Brown at Projet Pangée

Artists: Anjuli Rathod and Vanessa Brown

Exhibition title: The Far Off Blue Places

Venue: Projet Pangée, Montreal, Canada

Date: October 5 – November 11, 2017

Montreal, September 26, 2017 —PROJET PANGÉE is pleased to presentThe Far Off Blue Places by Anjuli Rathod (New York) and VanessaBrown (Vancouver). This exhibition brings together two artists who manifest different versions of a disembodied dream narrative. Evolving from the surreal, their works pry at the abstraction of the everyday through phantasmagoric mythologies of lived experience. Rathod through painting, and Brown through sculpture, create pieces that delve between the material worlds, drawing on the physical nature of gesture to elucidate the intimacy of creation.

Rathod’s paintings result from the surrealist process of automatic drawing, which allows her to link directly to her unconscious through memory and self-examination. Coarse, uneven, stylized brushstrokes pull us into a dream narrative, carving distance from realism. Her particular combination of animate subject (even where the inanimate is concerned), brushstroke and colour palette refers us, as the viewer, elsewhere: somewhere which is, as of yet, undefined, and which, more definitely, does not exist solely in the plane of the conscious. Such intentional disconnect roots in Rathod’s interest in diasporic identities, something she tackles through a use of elliptic imagery and animism of space when language is rendered ineffectual.

Brown’s sculptures move between the familiar and the abstract, finding liminal space in the everyday. Using metal, she works with multiple flat steel pieces that begin on a singular plane and move to a third dimension as they are assembled. She recreates objects and forms that frequent her subconscious to set the stage for dramatic narratives of things that have just occurred. In her own words, she contradicts the machinery (both literal and figurative) of metalwork, finding herself “oppositely drawn” to ways in which she can think through her hands. The resulting pieces become amorphous; perspectives that shift significantly as we move between them, each object a fragment of an unknown history.

Both series activate planes across all possible narratives; each artist’s work takes on new conversational tropes in context of the other. Brown’s sculptures evolve from their origins to occupy new and perhaps even unintentional paradigms by the time they are complete, while Rathod’s paintings draw narrative loops between characters that are initially unconnected, allowing a story to emerge from the process. For both artists, such processes imbue their works with aspects of the surreal, categorically shifting through time as they become tangible in space.

Together the paintings and sculptures hint at intertwining stories: the perfume bottle, the hand, and the orange of Brown’s sculpture draft a scene that might be as dark as it is light; the spider, snake, keys, and question marks in Rathod’s painting accumulate symbols of nightmarish experience which present in contrast to the metallic reflections of the sculptures. Feelings equally sinister and emancipatory are conjured by formal elements evoking beauty. It is these exploratory shapes, the curved, reflective surface of worked metal, colour, and the childlike, which move together in an intimate convergence of impressionistic dream referential.

Vanessa Brown is based in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish Territories. She received a BFA from Emily Carr University in 2013 and was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award. She has exhibited in Canada, Germany, the USA, and Mexico, notably with solo and two-person exhibitions at Wil Aballe Art Projects (Vancouver), Erin Stump Projects (Toronto) and group exhibitions at the Nanaimo Art Gallery (Nanaimo), Künstlerhaus Bethanien (Berlin) and King Street Station (Seattle).

Anjuli Rathod lives and works in Queens, New York. She received a BFA from School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and attended the AICAD/New York Studio Residency Program. She has participated in residencies at The Millay Colony of the Arts, the Studios at MASS MoCA and the Shandanken Project. Her work has been published inLumina Journal and Hyperallergic. She also co-founded Selena, an artist-run space in Brooklyn. She has an upcoming exhibition at the Knockdown Center (Queens).

Photography: all images copyright and courtesy of the artists and Projet Pangée, Montreal


 Image: Vanessa Brown.  Cosmic Screen , Oil on steel. 2017.    FULL REVIEW HERE:    http://www.akimbo.ca/akimblog/?id=1295

Image: Vanessa Brown. Cosmic Screen, Oil on steel. 2017. 

FULL REVIEW HERE:

http://www.akimbo.ca/akimblog/?id=1295

AKIMBO | Anjuli Rathod + Vanessa Brown at Projet Pangee, review by Tammer El-Sheikh

Anjuli Rathod and Vanessa Brown’s work, currently on display at Projet Pangée, is whimsical and inviting. Reoccurring icons in the former’s canvases (footsteps, creeping paws, serpents, spiders) and leading gestures in the latter’s sculptures (outstretched hands, sealed lips) are all cryptic promises. As with surrealism, they call up the viewer’s associative thinking powers on the spot, but they also connect critically with the past and productively contaminate the conservative, gendered, and exclusive spaces of abstract art’s vaunted history. 

In the 1950s and 1960s, on the cusp of an explosion of practices that make up the present contemporary art scene, critics like Clement Greenberg and Michael Fried (if not the artists they championed) launched a heavy-handed appeal to “save art” from losing itself in the everyday world of mere objects and entertainments. This was to be done by policing the boundaries between traditional disciplines (like painting versus sculpture), “entrenching them firmly in their areas of competence,” and riding them of any literary, theatrical, or illusionistic values. 

Rathod and Brown make putty of these outmoded distinctions between mediums. The curators’ decision to pair their work in fact reverses it: the canvasses conjure deep spaces from flat, mutely coloured expanses, while the sculptures shrink back from three-dimensions into flat, silhouetted images. Both artists are also tuned to the enchantments of the everyday. They blast through Greenberg and Fried’s rigidly sense-based division of the arts to call forth a full range of sensual experiences from the tactile and visual to the olfactory and the auditory. 

The sense of touch is evoked most often and most eerily. In Rathod’s Dissolution two arthritic hands encroach over blue folds on the edge of the canvas to a hot orange center. In her Night Scene, the same hands find their visual echo in spiders and a floating knife obscured by translucent curtains. In Brown’s wiry, totemic sculpture Attic Light, an outstretched hand sets up to catch a falling orange. InCosmic Screen the same elongated hand sprays a vintage perfume atomizer through a starry partition. Senses shade here from touch to smell, elsewhere from sound to taste, or from taste to sight. 

The works are crowded with sensual lures that, every now and again, turn to threats. Many of Rathod’s canvases are haunted by evocations of footsteps in the night, and Brown’s mostly playful sculptures harbour jagged hooks and prickly flowers. In Rathod’s Better Now the show’s invitation to a cheery world of multi-sensory experience takes on a cautionary tone. Bent and oversized American pennies are hoisted up on golden thread past a sign that reads “better now”, and then lowered down through a black hole in a padlock past one that reads “so long.” Her painting Waitingtrades lures for threats as a sickly green dreamer drops carrots printed on a cozy blanket onto a night table beside a lurking spider. 

Referring to the Cubists’ paintings and the death-blow they dealt to illusionism in Western art, Greenberg wrote: “A vibrating tension is set up as objects struggle to maintain their volume against the tendency of the real picture plane to reassert its material flatness and crush them to silhouettes.” For Fried, sculptors like Anthony Caro and David Smith would later take up their I-beams and spot-welders in this ongoing modernist fight for purity in what he called “a war against theatricality.” Rathod and Brown seem well past this now comically gendered-male drama. Their works reanimate the silhouettes that Greenberg was so intent on seeing as a last gasp of illusionism. And they find theatre everywhere – in the life of the senses, on sleepwalking adventures, and in dreams of everything from falling carrots to pennies from heaven or hell. 

Anjuli Rathod & Vanessa Brown: The Far Off Blue Places continues until November 11. 
Projet Pangée: http://projetpangee-en.com/ 
The gallery is accessible. 

Tammer El-Sheikh is a writer and teacher based in Montreal. His art criticism has appeared in Parachute, Canadian Art, ETC and C Magazine.


 Image: Ghost Town, 2006 C-print Norma (Vanessa Kwan, Diana Lopez Soto, Josh Neelands, Christy Nyiri, Pietro Sammarco, Erica Stocking, Ron Tran, Kara Uzelman)   PRESS RELEASE HERE  :    http://www.ecuad.ca/calendar/88-artists-for-88-years-an-alumni-retrospective

Image: Ghost Town, 2006 C-print
Norma (Vanessa Kwan, Diana Lopez Soto, Josh Neelands, Christy Nyiri, Pietro Sammarco, Erica Stocking, Ron Tran, Kara Uzelman)

PRESS RELEASE HERE:

http://www.ecuad.ca/calendar/88-artists-for-88-years-an-alumni-retrospective

88 Artists from 88 Years | An Alumni Retrospective | Emily Carr University

PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS

Saturday, Oct 28, 2017 - 12:00 PM - Friday, Nov 17, 2017 - 6:00 PM

Michael O'Brian Exhibition Commons
Opening Reception | October 27, 6pm

Part of The Big Reveal, 88 Artists from 88 Years is the inaugural exhibition in the Michael O'Brian Exhibition Commons.

88 Artists from 88 Years is an alumni exhibition to celebrate Emily Carr University’s move to our new campus at Great Northern Way. The exhibition will include works by graduates spanning the years 1929 to 2017. It will showcase the diverse range of visual art and design practices including painting, sculpture, film and video, ceramics, printmaking, industrial design, graphic design and new media.Further, the exhibition will feature a broad range of Emily Carr graduate’s work from student projects to later or recent work.

Featured Alumni include:

Heather Anderson (1998), Roy Arden (1982), Christopher Auchter (2002), Daina Augaitis (1983), Marian Penner Bancroft (1969), Derek Barnett (1998), Alistair Bell (1939), BC Binning (1932), Phillip Borsos (1975), Vanessa Brown (2013), Karin Bubaš (1998), Dorothy Burnett (1930), Tommy Chain (2015), Tom Chung (2012), Douglas Coupland (1984), Patrick Cruz (2010), Andrew Dadson (2003), Robert Davidson (1968), Jason DaSilva (2001), Michael de Courcy (1970), Chris Dixon (1997), Stan Douglas (1982), Geoffrey Farmer (1992), Kevan Funk (2011), Juan Gaitán (2002), Babak Golkar (2003), Julian Gosper (2002) + Ron Terada (1992), Lief Ambrosia Hall (2003), Colleen Heslin (2003), Carole Itter (1961), Lynn B. Johnston (1967), Brian Jungen (1992), Janice Kerbel (1994), Molly Lamb Bobak (1941), Laiwan (1983), Laura Wee Lay Laq (1977), Beatrice Lennie (1929), Glen Lewis (1958), Sing Lim (1945), Attila Richard Lukacs (1985), Kate Metten (2017), Robin Mitchell Cranfield (2003) and Judith Steedman (1997), Nadia Myre (1997), Terre Nash (1970), Gailan Ngan (2002), Wayne Ngan (1964), David Ostrem (1978), Luke Parnell (2012), Laura Piasta (2006), Natalie Purshwitz (2001), Irene Hoffer Reid (1929), Rick Ross (1966), Jeremy Shaw (2000), Kevin Schmidt (1997), Marianna Schmidt (1964), Gordon Smith (1946), Krista Belle Stewart (2006), Martha Sturdy (1978), Erdem Taşdelen (2010), Kim Tomczak (1975), Mina Totino (1982), Ian Verchere (1989), Neil Wedman (1977), Margaret Williams (1929), Jin-me Yoon (1990), Lawrence Paul Yuxwelupton (1983), Elizabeth Zvonar (2002) and art and design collectives:Malaspina Printmakers Society, Norma, Post Projects, Project Rainbow, Propeller, and SetUp Magazine.

The exhibition has been organized by Jonathan Middleton, Cate Rimmer, and Chelsea Yuill, with Susanna Browne and Kathy Slade. For further information, please contact the Libby Leshgold Gallery.


 Image: Anjuli Rathod + Vanessa Brown. Courtesy of Projet Pangée    ARTICLE LINK HERE:      https://wsimag.com/art/31635-anjuli-rathod-plus-vanessa-brown

Image: Anjuli Rathod + Vanessa Brown. Courtesy of Projet Pangée

ARTICLE LINK HERE: 

https://wsimag.com/art/31635-anjuli-rathod-plus-vanessa-brown

WALL STREET INTERNATIONAL | Anjuli Rathod + Vanessa Brown at Projet Pangee in Montreal, Canada

Projet Pangée is pleased to present The Far Off Blue Places by Anjuli Rathod (New York) and Vanessa Brown (Vancouver). This exhibition brings together two artists who manifest different versions of a disembodied dream narrative. Evolving from the surreal, their works pry at the abstraction of the everyday through phantasmagoric mythologies of lived experience. Rathod through painting, and Brown through sculpture, create pieces that delve between the material worlds, drawing on the physical nature of gesture to elucidate the intimacy of creation.

Rathod’s paintings result from the surrealist process of automatic drawing, which allows her to link directly to her unconscious through memory and self-examination. Coarse, uneven, stylized brushstrokes pull us into a dream narrative, carving distance from realism. Her particular combination of animate subject (even where the inanimate is concerned), brushstroke and colour palette refers us, as the viewer, elsewhere: somewhere which is, as of yet, undefined, and which, more definitely, does not exist solely in the plane of the conscious. Such intentional disconnect roots in Rathod’s interest in diasporic identities, something she tackles through a use of elliptic imagery and animism of space when language is rendered ineffectual.

Brown’s sculptures move between the familiar and the abstract, finding liminal space in the everyday. Using metal, she works with multiple flat steel pieces that begin on a singular plane and move to a third dimension as they are assembled. She recreates objects and forms that frequent her subconscious to set the stage for dramatic narratives of things that have just occurred. In her own words, she contradicts the machinery (both literal and figurative) of metalwork, finding herself “oppositely drawn” to ways in which she can think through her hands. The resulting pieces become amorphous; perspectives that shift significantly as we move between them, each object a fragment of an unknown history.

Both series activate planes across all possible narratives; each artist’s work takes on new conversational tropes in context of the other. Brown’s sculptures evolve from their origins to occupy new and perhaps even unintentional paradigms by the time they are complete, while Rathod’s paintings draw narrative loops between characters that are initially unconnected, allowing a story to emerge from the process. For both artists, such processes imbue their works with aspects of the surreal, categorically shifting through time as they become tangible in space.

Together the paintings and sculptures hint at intertwining stories: the perfume bottle, the hand, and the orange of Brown’s sculpture draft a scene that might be as dark as it is light; the spider, snake, keys, and question marks in Rathod’s painting accumulate symbols of nightmarish experience which present in contrast to the metallic reflections of the sculptures. Feelings equally sinister and emancipatory are conjured by formal elements evoking beauty. It is these exploratory shapes, the curved, reflective surface of worked metal, colour, and the childlike, which move together in an intimate convergence of impressionistic dream referential.

Vanessa Brown is based in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish Territories. She received a BFA from Emily Carr University in 2013 and was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award. She has exhibited in Canada, Germany, the USA, and Mexico, notably with solo and two-person exhibitions at Wil Aballe Art Projects (Vancouver), Erin Stump Projects (Toronto) and group exhibitions at the Nanaimo Art Gallery (Nanaimo), Künstlerhaus Bethanien (Berlin) and King Street Station (Seattle).

Anjuli Rathod lives and works in Queens, New York. She received a BFA from School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and attended the AICAD/New York Studio Residency Program. She has participated in residencies at The Millay Colony of the Arts, the Studios at MASS MoCA and the Shandanken Project. Her work has been published in Lumina Journal and Hyperallergic. She also co-founded Selena, an artist-run space in Brooklyn. She has an upcoming exhibition at the Knockdown Center (Queens).


 Image: Installation view of Vanessa Brown’s  The Hand of Camille  at Wil Aballe Art Projects, 2016.   LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:    http://canadianart.ca/features/this-womans-work/

Image: Installation view of Vanessa Brown’s The Hand of Camille at Wil Aballe Art Projects, 2016.

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:

http://canadianart.ca/features/this-womans-work/

CANADIAN ART | This Women's Work by Ginger Carlson

In Western Canada, women sculptors render visible the weight of hidden labour with industrial materials

OCTOBER 23, 2017

By GINGER CARLSON

Vancouver-based Vanessa Brown’s 2016 body of work The Hand of Camille calls into question the visibility of women and their erasure from art histories and institutions. Brown’s exhibition—titled after 19th-century French sculptor Camille Claudel, whose work was largely overshadowed by her lover Auguste Rodin and remained in relative obscurity until the mid-20th century—reflects on the often-invisible labour that comprises art- and exhibition-making through a series of sculptures fabricated primarily in steel. Executed in delicate geometric and figurative forms, the works push their thin armatures to stretch beyond the conventional semiotics of steel—which attribute weight and dimension as indicators of success—and instead evoke the subtleties and tactility of the medium. A simultaneous exploration of form and of the gendered idiosyncrasies involved in working with industrial materials, The Hand of Camille poetically reinserts the female hand that produces as a counter to those other hands that have often appeared more visibly.

The subject of visibility is of considerable relevance to women artists working in sculpture with industrial materials. In some cases, women are highly visible, by virtue of the anxieties of working in mostly male spaces or with mostly male fabricators. In others, they are hardly visible at all. They exist as preparators and artist assistants whose labours and hands fade into the background, or as artists in their own right, whose works are nonetheless unacknowledged or underappreciated. While Brown’s practice operates within a unique set of historical, political and social circumstances, her inquiries into material and artistic status also have great bearing on sculptors working in Alberta, where the oil and gas industry has made steel and scrap metals, as well as heavy industrial and metal fabrication technologies, more readily available than in other art centres. In Calgary and Edmonton, two counterpoints in the Prairies catalyzed by access to industrial materials and deeply entrenched Modernist art histories, there have been many important and influential women artists working with these materials who have remained only modestly recognized and appreciated outside of the province.

Katie Ohe was one of the first artists to work in the field of abstract sculpture in Alberta. She has lived and worked in Calgary for the majority of her career since graduating from the Alberta College of Art and Design in 1957. Ohe has established herself as an icon of considerable generosity, while mentoring and teaching at Mount Royal College, the University of Calgary and ACAD over the course of her nearly 60-year career. These practices will continue at the Kiyooka Ohe Arts Centre, a charitable society dedicated to the promotion of contemporary art, which, in addition to housing an art gallery and a sculpture garden, will be a mentoring and research centre, providing studio space, a residency program and access to Ohe and her husband Harry Kiyooka’s library and sculpture facilities.

Recognition of Ohe’s work came gradually. While she has participated in exhibitions, primarily in Alberta and outside of Canada, and has completed many high-profile public-art commissions, her visibility has not yet reached the level befitting an artist of such regional importance and influence. On the University of Calgary campus, generations of students have touched and rotated her seven-foot-tall steel-and-chrome Zipper (1975) in the hopes that it might render luck and magic. At ACAD, Janet’s Crown (2001), a tribute to Alberta artist, educator and mentor Janet Mitchell, overlooks the city and spins gently among a constellation of stainless-steel stars.

In Edmonton, where abstract formalist steel sculptures have a distinct regional tradition,Catherine Burgess has similarly forged a path into the medium, a generation after Ohe, as one of only a handful of women artists working in steel. While Burgess initially created formalist work in line with her male peers, motherhood acted as a catalyst for reexamining the narrative and subconscious potential of her sculpture. Like Ohe, Burgess was a mentor and teacher to emerging artists, in her case, at the University of Alberta. Burgess’s public sculptures wind through the downtown core and into the suburbs, with large-scale projects in Edmonton and suburban Sherwood Park alongside collaborators Sandra Bromley, Walter Jule and Royden Mills. Her most recent public sculpture, Return (2001), located on Jasper Avenue, gracefully twists and turns upwards from its base, three spiralling stacks of 393 individually cast aluminum rings.

Like Brown, Ohe and Burgess perform and unfold their sculptural forms to encompass and expose the matrix of steel’s mutability and its potential for intimacy. Ohe’s sculptures respond and move with the viewer, inviting touch and participation through tactility and performance. Pushing against the static monumentalism often implicated in large steel sculptures, her works are forged with interaction in mind and invite us to experience the potentiality of form in space, through spinning, rocking and leveraging precise weights toward continuous motion. Burgess’s sculptural forms poetically articulate philosophical and psychological concepts, constructing objects where thin steel, bronze and other metal armatures frame a counterweight of voids and spaces. In her exhibition “Absence / Presence” (2012), for example, steel and metals converse with stone while thin planar steel shapes open up the walls and floor space of the Art Gallery of Alberta, like absences that enter into the unknown and invisible.

Ohe and Burgess, alongside other pioneering artists working in sculpture and installation—Bromley, Lyndal Osborne and Isla Burns in Edmonton, Rita McKeough and Shelley Ouellet in Calgary and Kainai-Blood artist Faye HeavyShield, to name a few—have contributed much over the last 40 years to the forging of space and the mining of visibility for women artists working in Alberta. The prevailing theme, here, is of a multiplicity of hands working together toward greater celebration and exposure of diverse practices; the expansion of networks, resource sharing and mentorship; and unsettling dichotomies to make space for new readings, new counter-histories and new systems of equity. They prove that the process of making visible is not a monolith, but a multiplicity. 

Ginger Carlson is a curator and writer based in Calgary, where she is currently the director of Truck Contemporary Art. Carlson was also the winner of the 2016 Canadian Art Writing Prize. 


RATSDEVILLE: le webzine de la diversité en arts visuels | the visual arts' diversity webzine

Cette exposition rassemble deux artistes dont le travail exprime différentes versions d’une narration artistique dont le thème est le rêve désincarné. Évoluant dans l'univers du surréalisme, leurs œuvres s’immiscent dans l’étrangeté du quotidien à travers des mythologies fantasmagoriques créées à partir d’expériences vécues. Rathod par la peinture, et Brown par la sculpture, créent des pièces qui naviguent entre divers mondes matériels, et dessinent la nature physique d'un geste pour pénétrer dans l’intimité de la création.

This exhibition brings together two artists who manifest different versions of a disembodied dream narrative. Evolving from the surreal, their works pry at the abstraction of the everyday through phantasmagoric mythologies of lived experience. Rathod through painting, and Brown through sculpture, create pieces that delve between the material worlds, drawing on the physical nature of gesture to elucidate the intimacy of creation.

Pour peindre, Rathod s'inspire du processus surréaliste d’écriture automatique qui lui permet de créer un lien direct avec son inconscient, ce procédé lui permettant de forer dans les zones enfouies de sa mémoire et de se lancer dans une introspection poussée. Ses coups de pinceau stylisés, irréguliers et bruts nous plongent à l’intérieur d’une narration onirique, gravant une distance entre nous et le réalisme. Sa manière très particulière d’animer les sujets qu’elle traite nous transporte comme spectateurs dans un ailleurs, un quelque part qui est assez indéfini et qui définitivement n’existe pas uniquement sur le plan de la conscience. L’intérêt de Rathod pour les identités des diasporas se déconnecte intentionnellement de leurs racines. Elle aborde ses sujets grâce à un usage elliptique mais expressif de l’animation de l'image dans l'espace, là même où le langage est impuissant. 

Brown trouve dans le quotidien son sujet de prédilection. Elle cisèle le métal et le peint. Chacune de ses sculptures est un assemblage de plusieurs morceaux d'acier, chacun d'entre eux étant bidimensionnel, mais l'association de plusieurs de ces morceaux pour créer une oeuvre résulte en une troisième dimension. Ces morceaux d'acier représentent soit des objets du quotidien, soit des formes abstraites, tous provenant de son subconscient pour mettre en scène de façon dramatique des événements qui viennent de se produire. Chacun des fragments est une partie d’une histoire plus vaste, l’association de ces fragments nous permet de tisser des liens qui se modifient selon la perspective dans laquelle on se place, les histoires changeant donc au gré du point de vue que l’on adopte. Par sa manière de faire naître les idées simplement dans la pratique de son travail manuel, elle contredit l’industrialisation sans âme du monde métallurgique.

Chacune des séries d’œuvres des deux artistes active une infinité d’arcs narratifs. Chacune des oeuvres peut trouver de nouvelles explications dans la conversation qu’elle entretient avec sa voisine ainsi qu’avec les autres. Les sculptures de Brown évoluent sans cesse à chaque fois qu’un nouvel élément d'acier est ajouté, créant des associations d’idées qui peuvent ne pas être intentionnelles. Rathod, elle, dessine des boucles narratives entre des sujets qui ne sont pas initialement connectés, permettant à une histoire d’émerger de ce processus. 

Pour les deux artistes, la praxis irrigue leur travail d’une sève surréaliste, et la signification de chaque oeuvre se transforme au fur et à mesure de sa réalisation, leur sens ne cristallisant que lorsqu’elles occupent de façon organique tout l’espace qui doit être le leur. Ensemble, les peintures et les sculptures imbriquent leurs histoires dans un espace tangible : le flacon de parfum, la main et l'orange des sculptures de Brown composent une scène qui peut être aussi noire qu’elle peut être légère ; l’araignée, le serpent et les clefs dans les peintures de Rathod jouent avec les codes de l'iconographie du cauchemar. Tous ces symboles habituellement utilisés pour décrire des idées sinistres créent en nous des sensations ambiguës, car ces symboles sont contrebalancés par une évidente énergie ludique.

Vanessa Brown vit à Vancouver sur les territoires non cédés Salishes côtier. Elle a obtenu un baccalauréat en arts visuels à l'Université Emily Carr en 2013 et a été récipiendaire de la Bourse du chancelier. Son travail a été exposé au Canada, en Allemagne, aux États-Unis et au Mexique, notamment dans des expositions individuelles et collectives à Wil Aballe Art Projects (Vancouver), Erin Stump Projects (Toronto) à la Nanaimo Art Gallery (Nanaimo), à Künstlerhaus Bethanien (Berlin) et à King Street Station (Seattle).

Anjuli Rathod vit et travaille au Queens, New York. Elle a obtenu un baccalauréat en arts visuels de l'école du Musée des beaux-arts de Boston et a assisté au programme de résidence AICAD / New York Studio. Rathod a participé à des résidences à The Millay Colony of the Arts, aux Studios de MASS MoCA et au projet Shandanken. Son travail a été publié dans le Lumina Journal et Hyperallergic. Elle a également cofondé Selena, une galerie située à Brooklyn, dirigée par des artistes. Elle exposera prochainement au Knockdown Center (Queens).

Rathod’s paintings result from the surrealist process of automatic drawing, which allows her to link directly to her unconscious through memory and self-examination. Coarse, uneven, stylized brushstrokes pull us into a dream narrative, carving distance from realism. Her particular combination of animate subject (even where the inanimate is concerned), brushstroke and colour palette refers us, as the viewer, elsewhere: somewhere which is, as of yet, undefined, and which, more definitely, does not exist solely in the plane of the conscious. Such intentional disconnect roots in Rathod’s interest in diasporic identities, something she tackles through a use of elliptic imagery and animism of space when language is rendered ineffectual.

Brown’s sculptures move between the familiar and the abstract, finding liminal space in the everyday. Using metal, she works with multiple flat steel pieces that begin on a singular plane and move to a third dimension as they are assembled. She recreates objects and forms that frequent her subconscious to set the stage for dramatic narratives of things that have just occurred. In her own words, she contradicts the machinery (both literal and figurative) of metalwork, finding herself “oppositely drawn” to ways in which she can think through her hands. The resulting pieces become amorphous; perspectives that shift significantly as we move between them, each object a fragment of an unknown history.

Both series activate planes across all possible narratives; each artist’s work takes on new conversational tropes in context of the other. Brown’s sculptures evolve from their origins to occupy new and perhaps even unintentional paradigms by the time they are complete, while Rathod’s paintings draw narrative loops between characters that are initially unconnected, allowing a story to emerge from the process. For both artists, such processes imbue their works with aspects of the surreal, categorically shifting through time as they become tangible in space.

Together the paintings and sculptures hint at intertwining stories: the perfume bottle, the hand, and the orange of Brown’s sculpture draft a scene that might be as dark as it is light; the spider, snake, keys, and question marks in Rathod’s painting accumulate symbols of nightmarish experience which present in contrast to the metallic reflections of the sculptures. Feelings equally sinister and emancipatory are conjured by formal elements evoking beauty. It is these exploratory shapes, the curved, reflective surface of worked metal, colour, and the childlike, which move together in an intimate convergence of impressionistic dream referential.

Vanessa Brown is based in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish Territories. She received a BFA from Emily Carr University in 2013 and was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award. She has exhibited in Canada, Germany, the USA, and Mexico, notably with solo and two-person exhibitions at Wil Aballe Art Projects (Vancouver), Erin Stump Projects (Toronto) and group exhibitions at the Nanaimo Art Gallery (Nanaimo), Künstlerhaus Bethanien (Berlin) and King Street Station (Seattle).

Anjuli Rathod lives and works in Queens, New York. She received a BFA from School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and attended the AICAD/New York Studio Residency Program. She has participated in residencies at The Millay Colony of the Arts, the Studios at MASS MoCA and the Shandanken Project. Her work has been published in Lumina Journal and Hyperallergic. She also co-founded Selena, an artist-run space in Brooklyn. She has an upcoming exhibition at the Knockdown Center (Queens). 

 


 Image: Kent Monkman from The Human Zoo   ARTICLE LINK HERE:    http://canadianart.ca/must-sees/must-sees-week-october-5-11-2017/

Image: Kent Monkman from The Human Zoo

ARTICLE LINK HERE:

http://canadianart.ca/must-sees/must-sees-week-october-5-11-2017/

CANADIAN ART | Must-Sees This Week: October 5 to 11, 2017

Lots of great art exhibitions and events are taking place across the country this week. Here are our recommendations for debuting shows and events, and a few reminders about shows that are closing. Visit our Exhibition Finder for more listings of worthwhile shows that are already open.

MONTREAL & AREA

Kent Monkman debuts new video-paintings and prints in the exhibition “The Human Zoo,” which opens October 7 from 3 to 6 p.m. at Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain.

The first full day of DHC/ART’s 10th anniversary exhibition “L’Offre” is on October 5. Galerie Antoine Ertaskiran presents Nicolas Grenier’s exhibition “Precarious Geographies” with a vernissage October 11 from 5 to 8 p.m. A Montreal- and Los Angeles–based artist, Nicolas Grenier is known for his plural art practices.

Projet Pangée presents new work by Anjuli Rathod and Vanessa Brown titled “The Far Off Blue Places” starting on October 5, with a reception from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on that day. Join a guided tour of Momenta Biennale shows at Galerie B-312, Galerie Trois Points and Galerie Hugues Charbonneau on October 7 at 12:30 p.m.

A solo exhibition of works by Cynthia Girard-Renard beings at Musée d’art de Joliette on October 7. On October 11 at 6 p.m., Diagonale will host Berlin artist Nicolas Puyjalon for a performance inspired by the 1962 sci-fi novel Drowned World by James G. Ballard.

Karine Frechette opens new works at Galerie McClure on October 5 at 6 p.m., with a talk at 7 p.m. that evening. Abstract works by Jean-Paul Jérome go on view at Galerie d’Este starting on October 5 from 5 to 8 p.m.

In closings: “Pierre Julien: Blue Prints” and “Tristram Lansdowne: Modal Home” wrap up at Galerie Nicolas Robert on October 7.

TORONTO & AREA

A touring career retrospective of artist Alex Janvier—a residential school survivor and founding member of the “Indian Group of Seven”—opens at the McMichael on October 7. “Ken Nicol: a thing worth doing,” featuring new work by the artist, opens October 5 from 6 to 9 p.m. at Olga Korper Gallery.

New works by Stephen Appleby-Barr debut in the exhibition “Corvidae,” opening October 5 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Nicholas Metivier Gallery. Artist Lisa Myers gives at talk at Onsite Gallery on October 10 at 7 p.m. She is one of the artists featured in the gallery’s show “raise a flag: works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000–2015).”

Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art presents “The Labour of Commemoration,” an exhibition by Blake Fitzpatrick and Vid Ingelevics, with an opening on October 5 from 7 to 10 p.m. The exhibition represents the culmination of more than a decade of research into the history of the post-1989 Berlin Wall.

Barbara Edwards Contemporary presents a solo exhibition of new paintings and works on paper by Medrie MacPhee. In 2012, MacPhee began a fake fashion line (RELAX) out of clothing scavenged in cheap discount stores, and her new work reflects a further turn away from architectural themes of her past oeuvre.

Artists Regina José Galindo, Osvaldo Ramírez Castillo and Underline are featured in the exhibition “Vehemence,” opening October 5 from 7 to 9 p.m. at Sur Gallery. Artist talks will happen at 8 p.m. The exhibition explores the human body as a site of trauma and memory.

Mindy Yan Miller‘s “Two Cows and a Coke” and “John Abrams: Spring, French River” open October 7 from 2 to 5 p.m. at Loop. “Pareidolia,” an exhibition of paintings by Toronto based artist P. Elaine Sharpe, opens at Wil Kucey Gallery on October 5 from 6 to 9 p.m.

A bus tour of some important craft-related exhibitions will depart Craft Ontario on October 7 at 12 p.m., and head to Emily Jan’s After the Hunt at Hamilton Artists Inc. and theCanadian Craft Biennial at the Art Gallery of Burlington.

In closings: “In Dialogue” and “Making Models” finish at the Art Museum at the University of Toronto on October 7; the massive EDIT: Expo for Design, Innovation and Technology finishes October 8 at 21 Don Roadway; Scott Everingham‘s exhibition of recent paintings ends at General Hardware on October 7; shows by Ellen Bleiwas andGreg Haberny wrap up at Angell Gallery on October 7.

VANCOUVER

Walid Raad is in conversation with Jayce Salloum on Beirut on October 10 at 7 p.m. at Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Center, SFU Vancouver. That’s a prelude to the opening of Raad’s exhibition “Sweet Talk: Commissions (Beirut 1994),” which takes place October 11 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Audain Gallery. There will also be a Walid Raad artist talk October 11 from 7 to 8 p.m.

Audain Distinguished Artist-in-Residence talks take place October 10 at 6 p.m. at Emily Carr University of Art + Design. This year the program features Filipino artists Isabel and Alfredo Aquilizan, who produce collaborative artworks that use the processes of collecting to express ideas of migration, family and memory. While participating in the residency, they will be making a large site-specific installation in the Libby Leshgold Gallery as their contribution to the upcoming group exhibition entitled “The Pacific.”

Anthony Phillips and Timothy Taylor engage in a conversation on memory at the Belkin Art Gallery on October 11 at 7 p.m. Phillips is a professor in the UBC Department of Psychiatry while Timothy Taylor is associate professor of fiction and non-fiction in the UBC Creative Writing Program.

CALGARY

“Future Memories (Present Tense): Contemporary Practices in Perspective” features six Indigenous artists at ACAD’s Illingworth Kerr Gallery, including Sonny Assu, Mark Igloliorte, Meryl McMaster, Peter Morin, Rolande Souliere and Adrian Stimson. The exhibition opens October 5 from 5 to 7 p.m. There is also a related symposium October 4 and 5 at the gallery, which includes Canadian Art Indigenous editor-at-large Lindsay Nixon.

Sandra Sawatzky‘s 220-foot, hand-stitched history of oil, titled Black Gold Tapestry, debuts at the Glenbow Museum on October 7.  “Reimagining Boundaries,” an exhibition tour withElizabeth Diggon, examines current Esker Foundation shows by Mary Anne Barkhouseand Postcommodity. It takes place October 5 from 7 to 8 p.m. On October 10 at 7 p.m. atContemporary Calgary, join a community consultation to assist the organization in determining a course for its future. (Just a few weeks ago, Contemporary Calgary decided to pull out of a plan to reno the city’s old planetarium as an art space.)

HALIFAX

“The Halifax Explosion”—including five projects to commemorate the centennial year of the Halifax Explosion—opens October 11 at 6 p.m. at the Dalhousie Art Gallery. There will be a panel at 7 p.m. nearby in the James Dunn Theatre, with reception in the gallery to follow. Watch for projects by Narratives in Space + Time Society and artist Claire Hodge—as well as a unique curatorial venture by Paige Connell, Peter Dykhuis and Allan Ruffmanthat focuses on Arthur Lismer‘s prints of the Halifax Explosion aftermath. James Boxall, director of the GISciences Centre at Dalhousie University has also undertaken a project to create a digital platform that recreates historic images of Halifax in 2D and 3D.

Thierry Delva and Steven Holmes were MFA students together at NSCAD in 1992. In the years since, each has developed a career in the visual arts: Delva as a professor at NSCAD, and Holmes as a curator living and working in the US. “25”—opening October 5 at 6 p.m. at Hermes—is an exhibition that marks 25 years of conversation and argument about art.

New Khyber artist in residence Ryan Josey gives a talk on October 10 from 12 to 2 p.m. about his work, which is interested in the idea of queerness as meaning “out of place.”

STRIKE—Sergei Eisenstein‘s stylized and theatrical film dramatizing a labour strike at a Czarist-era heavy manufacturing facility—gets screened with a live score by Mohammad Sahraei and guests at 7 p.m. at the Paul O’Regan Hall at Halifax Central Library.

VICTORIA

On October 7, the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria’s show “Beyond the Edges: Geometry + Art” opens with a public open house. The exhibition questions dominant Modernist art histories and instead favours cross-cultural and -temporal explorations of the possible meanings of geometry in art. With an emphasis on artists of the West Coast, “Beyond the Edges” features works from the collection by such figures as Lawren S. Harris, Jan Zach, Elza Mayhew, B.C. Binning, Roy Kiyooka, Rita Letendre, Takao Tanabe, Susan Point and Luanne Martineau.

And closing at the AGGV on October 8 is “Moving Forward by Looking Back, The First 30 Years of Collecting Art at the AGGV.”

PETERBOROUGH

Evans Contemporary and Star X present “The Exhausted Sky,” a new body of work by Japanese photographer Mamoru Tsukada, starting with a reception October 6 from 6 p.m. onwards. By photographing the sky at three locations related to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima—Berlin, Hiroshima and the Trinity test site in New Mexico—Tsukada speculates on the cause and consequence of power, fear and the realities of human survival.

The [in]Sites performance series continues with a talk by Brian Solomon and Aria Evanson October 11 at 12 p.m. at Nozhem First Peoples’ Performance Space at Trent University.

QUEBEC CITY

Join in on a roundtable October 11 at 5 p.m. at Vu; the talk addresses degradation of the image, death and the demise of certain practices. The talk will be moderated by artist and curator Hélène Matte and artists Moïa Jobin-Paré et Annie St-Jean, who are currently part of the exhibition “Goodbye to photography” at Maison Hamel-Bruneau.

HAMILTON

“Fiona Kinsella: In Progress” begins October 6 at the Assembly in Hamilton. Here, Kinsella presents work in progress: a selection of recent and new oil paintings developed during the exhibition.

WINNIPEG

Library Gallery will open an exhibition entitled “Cliff Eyland: Recent Works” on October 6 from 1 to 9 p.m. The gallery has been on hiatus since Eyland had a double lung transplant in November 2016.

Our weekly must-sees, published each Thursday, are chosen from opening and event announcements sent to preview@canadianart.ca at least two days prior to publication. For listings of art openings, exhibitions and events, visit canadianart.ca/exhibitions.

 


 Image: Anjuli Rathod. Blue Shell Blue Well, 2017   ARTICLE LINK HERE:    https://create-magazine.com/features/the-far-off-blue-places-by-anjuli-rathod-and-vanessa-brown

Image: Anjuli Rathod. Blue Shell Blue Well, 2017

ARTICLE LINK HERE:

https://create-magazine.com/features/the-far-off-blue-places-by-anjuli-rathod-and-vanessa-brown

CREATE MAGAZINE | The Far Off Blue Places at Projet Pangee

Artists: Anjuli Rathod (New York) and Vanessa Brown (Vancouver)

Exhibition title: The Far Off Blue Places

Duration: From October 5 to November 11, 2017    

Exhibition text: Xan Shian    

Montreal, September 26, 2017 — PROJET PANGÉE is pleased to present The Far Off Blue Places by Anjuli Rathod (New York) and Vanessa Brown (Vancouver). This exhibition brings together two artists who manifest different versions of a disembodied dream narrative. Evolving from the surreal, their works pry at the abstraction of the everyday through phantasmagoric mythologies of lived experience. Rathod through painting, and Brown through sculpture, create pieces that delve between the material worlds, drawing on the physical nature of gesture to elucidate the intimacy of creation.

Rathod’s paintings result from the surrealist process of automatic drawing, which allows her to link directly to her unconscious through memory and self-examination. Coarse, uneven, stylized brushstrokes pull us into a dream narrative, carving distance from realism. Her particular combination of animate subject (even where the inanimate is concerned), brushstroke and colour palette refers us, as the viewer, elsewhere: somewhere which is, as of yet, undefined, and which, more definitely, does not exist solely in the plane of the conscious. Such intentional disconnect roots in Rathod’s interest in diasporic identities, something she tackles through a use of elliptic imagery and animism of space when language is rendered ineffectual.

Brown’s sculptures move between the familiar and the abstract, finding liminal space in the everyday. Using metal, she works with multiple flat iron pieces that begin on a singular plane and move to a third dimension as they are assembled. She recreates objects and forms that frequent her subconscious to set the stage for dramatic narratives of things that have just occurred. In her own words, she contradicts the machinery (both literal and figurative) of metalwork, finding herself “oppositely drawn” to ways in which she can think through her hands. The resulting pieces become amorphous; perspectives that shift significantly as we move between them, each object a fragment of an unknown history.

Both series activate planes across all possible narratives; each artist’s work takes on new conversational tropes in context of the other. Brown’s sculptures evolve from their origins to occupy new and perhaps even unintentional paradigms by the time they are complete, while Rathod’s paintings draw narrative loops between characters that are initially unconnected, allowing a story to emerge from the process. For both artists, such processes imbue their works with aspects of the surreal, categorically shifting through time as they become tangible in space.

Together the paintings and sculptures hint at intertwining stories: the wine bottle, orange and cigarette of Brown’s sculpture draft a scene that might be as dark as it is light; the spider, snake, keys, and question marks in Rathod’s painting accumulate symbols of nightmarish experience which present in contrast to the metallic reflections of the sculptures. Feelings equally sinister and emancipatory are conjured by formal elements evoking beauty. It is these exploratory shapes, the curved, reflective surface of worked metal, colour, and the childlike, which move together in an intimate convergence of impressionistic dream referential.

Biographies 

Vanessa Brown is based in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish Territories. She received a BFA from Emily Carr University in 2013 and was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award. She has exhibited in Canada, Germany, the USA, and Mexico, notably with solo and two-person exhibitions at Wil Aballe Art Projects (Vancouver), Erin Stump Projects (Toronto) and group exhibitions at the Nanaimo Art Gallery (Nanaimo), Künstlerhaus Bethanien (Berlin) and King Street Station (Seattle).

Anjuli Rathod lives and works in Queens, New York. She received a BFA from School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and attended the AICAD/New York Studio Residency Program. She has participated in residencies at The Millay Colony of the Arts, the Studios at MASS MoCA and the Shandanken Project. Her work has been published in Lumina Journal andHyperallergic. She also co-founded Selena, an artist-run space in Brooklyn. She has an upcoming exhibition at the Knockdown Center (Queens). 

About

Projet Pangée is located in the Belgo Building in downtown Montreal. The gallery presents emerging artists from the local and international scene, in a youthful, contemporary setting.

For further information contact Projet Pangée via email at galerieprojetpangee@gmail.com


 Image: Vanessa Brown. Wednesday Charm, 2016    ARTICLE LINK HERE:     http://canadianart.ca/features/social-2017-auction-piece/

Image: Vanessa Brown. Wednesday Charm, 2016

ARTICLE LINK HERE:

 http://canadianart.ca/features/social-2017-auction-piece/

CANADIAN ART | 6 Highlights from Canadian Art’s Upcoming Auction

AUGUST 22, 2017

BY CANADIAN ART

On September 28, one of Canada’s most exciting contemporary art auctions will happen at Social 2017: Reveal—an evening in support of the vital work ofCanadian Art.

Prestigious national and international artists who have generously donated to this year’s auction include Geoffrey Farmer, Kent Monkman, Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, Julia Dault and other art luminaries.

Here are six works in particular that have caught the attention of leading curators, critics and collectors advising our auction. To see more, visitcanadianart.ca/social2017.

Wednesday Charm by Vanessa Brown

Weekday charms: we can all use them, at work and in love. Vanessa Brown makes metal sculpture with a light hand and a playful heart. Her vertical sculpture Wednesday Charmholds stormy weather atop with a silver cloud and lightning bolt over an empty wine bottle disgorging its last drop. These float above a fetching red high-heel shoe. Looks like the party lasted longer than the weekend. Is this good or bad luck?

Brown’s sculpture melds popular culture, jewellery, decor and craft, but leaves the question of meaning open, ambiguously posed by the objects she assembles. From the early 20th century craze of decorative bracelets dangling miniature objects, launched by the unlikely, staunch Queen Victoria, to its popular role as a de rigeur rite of passage for young ladies in the 1950s, the charm bracelet has seen several resurgences. I have a penchant for bracelets, but alas, no charm bracelet in my collection. Vanessa Brown’s Wednesday Charmtempts me to get started, with hers. –Jessica Bradley, curator and collections advisor

Returns by Claire Greenshaw

Splashy, spectral rings left over from cups of coloured water—traces of vein-blue, grape-purple, ochre-red and yolk-yellow—coalesce to form the cosmic composition of Claire Greenshaw’s Returns. The watery circles are faithful reproductions, in delicate coloured pencil, of residue from the artist’s studio matboard. Like Mary Pratt, Greenshaw has a knack for finding the imperfect beauty in the ordinary, and, with her humour, patience and grace, is able to draw out the magic in the seemingly mundane. Returns is a small devotion—a reminder that there is invisible labour concealed within all acts of love and care, and that it’s important to slow down and take notice. –Rosie Prata, writer

Choker by Ambera Wellmann

Ambera Wellmann’s work has some kind of magic flowing through it. Strange and lingering in the serene, Wellman’s imagery is coolly distanced, often engaged with depictions of ceramic figures and surfaces. Her works combine the weighted history of objects, with ephemeral glances and interferences that shift the content into the surreally unknown but recognizable. Her distinct surfaces hold the eye, as if trapped within a fine glaze, hardened, holding your gaze but obscuring any clarity—except, here, in the traced black definition of eyes, staring back. –Corrie Jackson, associate art curator, Royal Bank of Canada

Study after ‘Backbone’ by Sascha Braunig

If Sascha Braunig’s flawlessly executed, beguiling paintings did not captivate viewers in the 2015 New Museum Triennial, New York audiences were afforded ample opportunity to assess her painterly prowess at her more recent solo exhibition at MoMA PS1. Few Canadian artists have commanded such a venue with the concise elegance that Braunig brings to her craft.

The DNA of a Braunig image may splice together the mannered Deco style of a Tamara de Lempicka portrait and the uncanny precision of a Frida Kahlo face, with off-key patterning and palette choices reminiscent of Op art. When she was an MFA student at Yale, Braunig encountered Peter Halley, Neo-Geo’s adroit theorist, from whom she gleaned her razor-clear aesthetic: sharp lines abstractly applied to form ideal bodies. Upside down is the right way up for Braunig, whose work is conceptual yet deeply physical. –Leslie Gales, president of the Midland Group of Companies, and David Moos, curator

Being Tucked by Lili Huston-Herterich

There is nothing more comforting than a well-worn t-shirt, held onto long after its best-before date; it is like a second skin that you don’t want to shed. Artist Lili Huston-Herterich memorializes the idiosyncratic history of garments she solicited from Toronto’s Junction residents by stretching them over photosensitive paper and exposing them to light. Like an X-ray, these photograms reveal details within. Marks of wear are captured on the surface of the photo while the artist’s hand is captured in the dense, swirling graphite drawing that frames the image. Being Tucked is a poetic commemoration of Huston-Herterich and the community where she works. –Stefan Hancherow, Social 2017 art advisory committee co-chair & curator

Kowloon/Wudang Walled City by Howie Tsui

One of 2017’s hands-down exhibition highlights for me so far was Howie Tsui’s spectacular early spring installation at the Vancouver Art Gallery, “Retainers of Anarchy.” The installation was crowned by a five-channel, 25-foot-long scroll-style animation that vividly portrayed Tsui’s personal interpretation of the gory, subversive martial-arts genre wuxia.

Tsui sets part of his video in a mythic rendering of Hong Kong’s now-demolished Kowloon Walled City, home to outcasts of all sorts, and an architectural statement of resistance against Chinese authority. This elaborate paper work materializes the animation’s centrepiece, giving breathtaking, maddeningly detailed insight into Kowloon—and into Tsui’s hyper-intelligent, exacting approach to art making. –David Balzer, editor-in-chief and co-publisher, Canadian Art

To view all of the works in our Social 2017: Reveal auction, visit canadianart.ca/social2017.


 Image: studio portrait of Shary Boyle, 2017, by Marc DeGuerre    ARTICLE LINK HERE:    http://artmatters.ca/wp/2017/08/artist-spotlight-shary-boyle/

Image: studio portrait of Shary Boyle, 2017, by Marc DeGuerre

ARTICLE LINK HERE:

http://artmatters.ca/wp/2017/08/artist-spotlight-shary-boyle/

Art Gallery of Ontario | Art Matters | Artist Spotlight: Shary Boyle

Scarborough-born artist and AGO Trustee Shary Boyle is well-known throughout Canada – and after representing the country at the 2013 Venice Biennale, internationally as well. But however common her name might be throughout the art world, the best way to get to know her is through her art itself.

As The Walrus wrote about Boyle’s work, “Her focus is deeply personal. While many artists follow theoretical, conceptually obtuse practices, she makes art that is highly literal and figurative… Although her work resonates with Canadians, it is not rooted in Canadian themes. From the outset, her drawing, painting, sculpture, and performance have mined universal realities, such as death, aging, sexuality, pain, injustice, and grief, creating defiant narratives about marginalization and otherness.”

And once you know Shary’s work, you don’t easily forget it – or her. AGO visitors might remember Boyle from her exhibition Shary Boyle: Flesh & Blood in 2010 (after winning the 2009 Gershon Iskowitz Prize at the AGO). The exhibition presented 28 works, including four large-scale installations, sculptures, paintings and drawings.

We caught up with Shary after a very busy spring to see what she’s up to now.

AGO: You’ve recently been shown in Calgary (the Esker Foundation), Amsterdam (Suzanne Biederberg Gallery), and South Korea (Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennale). Busy spring! What was it like seeing your work in those three very different areas at the same time?
Shary: The relative newness of a contemporary art audience and history in Calgary is a sharp contrast to the ancient relationships between artists and audiences in the Netherlands and Korea. The Esker audience was thrilled to discover new connections between northern and southern art practises, the Amsterdam contemporary art scene was interested in deviations from their ceramic and painting history, and in South Korea, museum people were keen to share traditions. The response to any given artwork can change dramatically depending on the context and perspective of the culture it is viewed within.

AGO: You’re constantly working with other artists, and across fields (like your live performance work with Christine Fellows). What do you get out of collaborative projects with other artists? Conversely, what do you love about working solo?
Shary: The heart of my practise is introspective and solitary – collaborations bring me out of the studio into exciting, challenging exchanges with completely different creative ways of thinking. My approach to performance connects with audiences in a very social and shared way. And after the public immediacy of a tour, it feels wonderful to retreat to quiet and personal reflection.

AGO: What do you have coming up next? What themes or materials are you interested in exploring?
Shary: I’m working on a series of sculptures and drawings inspired by traditions of theatre, dance and clowning. In our media and government climate of artifice, used to bend truth and manipulate the public, I’ve become very interested in examining the ways artists have used artifice to tell the truth about human nature. The work will be presented at Gallery 3 in Québec City this November.

AGO: Which artists have inspired you lately?
Shary: Luke Parnell’s carvings, Amber Wellman’s paintings, Vanessa Brown’s metal sculptures, Jérôme Havre’s marionettes, Lindsay Montgomery’s ceramics, John Kurok’s masks, Jim Holyoak’s massive ink drawings, everything Shuvinai Ashoona touches, the artist-activist duo Embassy of Imagination… I can go on. All from or working in so-called Canada.


 Image: Stoneware jug with tenmoku glaze, Lari Robson, circa 1970s   LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:    http://canadianart.ca/exhibitions/dream-islands/

Image: Stoneware jug with tenmoku glaze, Lari Robson, circa 1970s

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:

http://canadianart.ca/exhibitions/dream-islands/

CANADIAN ART | Dream Islands

EXHIBITION JUL 21 2017 - SEP 17 2017

Curated by Jesse Birch and Emma Metcalfe Hurst

Dream Islands is a group exhibition that takes the work of late Salt Spring Island-based potter Lari Robson (1942-2012) as a central point of inspiration. This exhibition features Robson’s pottery alongside a poster edition by Sonnet L’Abbé, and new artworks by Derya Akay, Vanessa Brown, Maggie Groat, Yuki Kimura, and Anne Low, that navigate islands of the imagination through intersections between art and craft practices.

As a creator of refined and useful pottery, Robson maintained a devoted and humble practice as an island potter. He sold vases, mugs, tea bowls, lidded jars, casseroles, jugs, serving bowls and other dishware every Saturday at the Salt Spring Island Farmers Market. He made personal and lasting relationships with his patrons and his community, and his pottery continues to be used and treasured in many households on Salt Spring Island and beyond.

In December 2016, Nanaimo Art Gallery received a generous donation of ceramics from the estate of Victoria-based Curator and Art Historian Diane Carr (1941-2016) which included a unique stoneware jug made by Robson in the 1970s. Jugs are inherently social objects: they constantly empty themselves out through the act of giving. This spirit of reciprocity became a guiding inspiration for the exhibition.

For the occasion of Dream Islands each participating artist was gifted a pot of Robson’s to live with, and reflect on while creating new works for the exhibition. Through a variety of different media including weaving, metalwork, and blown glass the artists employ the materials and labours of craft, but as contemporary artworks, these creations avoid the burden of use. The artworks will be on display in dialogue with a selection of Robson’s pots borrowed from personal and private collections of his patrons, friends, and family, now also liberated from their daily use through new social and aesthetic encounters shared in the gallery.

On August 27, in dialogue with Dream Islands, we present a special event on Saysutshun (Newcastle Island) titled Island Dreams. This even inverts Dream Island by offering an embodied and communal experience of the physical space of an island, while encountering performances, poetry readings, and temporary art installations.

These projects are presented as a part of Nanaimo Art Gallery’s celebration of our 40th anniversary in 2017. All year, through exhibitions, special projects, education programs and events, we explore the question “What does it mean to live on an Island?”

Sonnet L’Abbé, Derya Akay, Vanessa Brown, Maggie Groat, Yuki Kimura, Anne Low, Lari Robson


 Image:  Gallery view, Water Astonishing and Difficult Altogether Makes a Meadow and a Stroke , courtesy of WAAP   ARTICLE LINK HERE:    https://whitehotmagazine.com/articles/takes-line-from-gertrude-stein/3731

Image: Gallery view, Water Astonishing and Difficult Altogether Makes a Meadow and a Stroke, courtesy of WAAP

ARTICLE LINK HERE:

https://whitehotmagazine.com/articles/takes-line-from-gertrude-stein/3731

WHITEHOT MAGAZINE | WAAP Takes a Line from Gertrude Stein

Water Astonishing and Difficult Altogether Makes a Meadow and a Stroke
June 22-July 29
WAAP
688 E Hastings St, Vancouver BC, V6A 1R1

By ERIC BENEDON, AUG. 2017

Vancouver knows water, from a drizzle to a downpour. In the summer, however, the weather clears up, so Wil Aballe Art Projects (WAAP) filled soggy hole in the city’s heart with his recent group show Water Astonishing and Difficult Altogether Makes a Meadow and a Stroke. The title of the show is an excerpt Gertrude Stein’s Tender Buttons. The book is broken into three sections: “Objects,” “Food,” and “Rooms”. It is worth noting that Water Astonishing is found in the “Objects” section as the show alludes to the creative potential of water. Through their unique practices, the artists questioned the use of water as a medium or methodology. Wil Aballe’s curation of the show facilitated connections among the artists’ wide range of approaches despite the daunting theoretical undertone.

Aballe’s approach can be summed up thusly: “if you hang [all of an artist’s work] together, they cancel each other out.” I found his approach to be successful in creating a dialogue between the pieces. Rather than considering ideas existing within a solitary vacuum, the viewer was invited into a group mind where the artists’ concepts played off one another to create a larger discourse regarding how water can be considered as a material. 

Aballe stemmed the show’s premise from Ebony Rose’s water colours. Rose pools water on paper and allows it to dry, thus exploring the fluid boundaries of liquid flow and material solidarity. Roses' work “Untitled” featured a dark geometric shape rising above what could be a horizon. The meticulously shaped water colour gives a sense of the tension required in creating beauty.

WAAP, in a way, feels almost like a sensory deprivation tank, except your eyes and mind are still stimulated. You submerge yourself into it by going down a set of stairs and enclose yourself within a windowless gallery. The isolation from the outside world allows you to completely immerse yourself in the curated walls. With the group aspect of Water Astonishing and Difficult Altogether Makes a Meadow and a Stroke, Aballe brought together a range of literal and figurative interpretations of water and/or liquid, from the photographs of Evann Siebens’ flooded childhood home to Vanessa Browns’ Ivans in the centre of the gallery. The show did not revolve around water, but rather drew from it. Water, which is uncontrollable, was controlled. Or, at least, the art presented a semblance of control.

In the entrance, photographs by Evann Siebens and Maegan Hill-Carroll ruminated on fragments of memory. Siebens showed multi-layered inkjet prints of the remnants of her flooded childhood home, featuring warped records and soaked pianos in a way that made you want to sort through the refuse for any possible keepsakes. Conversely, Hill-Carroll presented a small snapshot of her time living in Botswana. On a particularly hot day, a bucket of water has been thrown onto tile, where a naked smiling boy splashes around like a fish on a dock. The viewer had to look closely to see the smile, reminding us of the voyeuristic gaze we were placing upon the young boy. 

As you continued, three of Niall McClelland’s Stains adorned the walls. The almost-surreal works were psychedelic stained glass on Japanese paper. Achieved by spilling inkjet cartridges onto rough paper and then folding it into bundles, an array of tie-dye patterns emerged across the Japanese paper in careful but unplanned designs. Like Rose’s pooled water colours across the gallery, McClelland's spilled ink cartridges manipulated the element of chance to form pure aesthetic abstraction.

Next to the large sheets of hallucinatory paper, a pink alien-like figure drowned face-down in a body of crystal blue water, immersed in the binary between male and female. InShallow, the male simultaneously engaged and drowned in his environment, which took the form of a tropical seascape. Alex Gibson’s intimate and haunting painting contemplated ideals of place and how to navigate them. 

With Water Astonishing, Wil Aballe essentially created a cocktail party on the walls for his artists to intermingle and for WAAP visitors to join in. Yet Nicolas Sassoon had the gallery’s back wall to himself and appeared intentionally isolated. His brooding triptych on metallic paper, Storms, almost seemed to undulate. By standing alone, the images, generated with pixels, called the viewer in for a closer look. The three dark frames produce a melancholic effect that left the viewer somewhat unsettled, as if there were a cloud hanging over their head.

The anxious pit in one's stomach created by Sassoon continued as the viewer was invited to piece together photographs of Christopher Lacroix’s performance There Are Reasons to Remain Bound, in which he read years worth of his journal entries backwards as an attempt to review himself. The photographs showed the unmistakable sign of Lacroix urinating in his light blue jeans over the course of the reading. As the journal itself details grappling with sexuality, the review, then, was Lacroix allowing himself to release any tensions. 

Another of Gibson’s paintings was next to Lacroix’s documentation, this one titled Full. The same alien-like figure now had water spilling from his mouth and ears, in a way that is reminiscent of blood after a traumatic accident. Side by side, the works echoed a complete expulsion of the past. 

With its flowing lines and placement in the centre of the gallery, Vanessa Brown’s Ivans gave the impression of a fountain. If Sassoon’s Storms stood alone in their darkness, they were nonetheless balanced by the stark white of Ivans. Equally isolated, the entirely white sculpture was reminiscent of Italian marble. But rather than resembling a typical cherub or a goddess, any figuration was instead suggested by the bends and angles of the abstract sculpture. 

Liquid’s materiality permeated throughout Water Astonishing and Difficult Altogether Makes a Meadow and a Stroke. The artists chosen by Wil Aballe explored the boundaries of water as an object. Searching beyond our immediate associations of a clear blue resource, water becomes a subject of fear and acceptance, a purveyor of chance visions, and a reminder of identity. WAAP acted as a submarine where these ideas were able to live in proximity, and the group’s cohesion ultimately led to success. WM

ERIC BENEDON

Eric Benedon is a writer in Vancouver, BC. He recently graduated from UBC where he studied Art History and Creative Writing. 


 Image: The Canadian premiere of Stephanie Comilang’s “sci-fi documentary” on Filipina migrant workers has its Canadian premiere this week in Toronto. Image courtesy the artist.   ARTICLE LINK HERE:    http://canadianart.ca/must-sees/must-sees-this-week-december-8-to-14-2016/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Weekly%20December%208&utm_content=Weekly%20December%208+CID_4320e88cd108cf198ab26aec0a515132&utm_source=E%20Weekly%20Campaign&utm_term=MUST-SEES

Image: The Canadian premiere of Stephanie Comilang’s “sci-fi documentary” on Filipina migrant workers has its Canadian premiere this week in Toronto. Image courtesy the artist.

ARTICLE LINK HERE:

http://canadianart.ca/must-sees/must-sees-this-week-december-8-to-14-2016/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Weekly%20December%208&utm_content=Weekly%20December%208+CID_4320e88cd108cf198ab26aec0a515132&utm_source=E%20Weekly%20Campaign&utm_term=MUST-SEES

CANADIAN ART | Must-Sees This Week: December 8th - 14th 

DECEMBER 8, 2016

BY CANADIAN ART

Lots of great art exhibitions opening and events taking place across the country this week. Here are our recommendations for debuting shows and events, and a few reminders about shows that are ongoing or closing. Visit our Exhibition Finder for even more worthwhile shows that are already open.

Vancouver

Candice Hopkins and Monika Szewczyk, along with Nicolaus Schafhausen and Beau and Linnea Dick, will present an afternoon talk titled “Islands, Sovereignty and Decolonial Futures” at the Liu Institute for Global Issues on December 12 from 2 to 5 p.m. It’s a great opportunity to get insight into the curatorial practice and dialogue in documenta 14, which includes participation by Beau Dick and Linnea Dick.

“The Best Example is All Together,” a group show featuring works by Christos Dikeakos, Vanessa Brown and Nicolas Sassoon, among others, opens December 10 from 2 to 4 p.m. at Wil Aballe Art Projects.

Toronto

Lumapit sa akin, paraiso (Come to me, Paradise) is a science fiction documentary byStephanie Comilang that uses the backdrop of Hong Kong and the various ways in which the Filipina migrant worker occupies Central on Sundays. Enjoy the Canadian premiere of the film December 8 at 8eleven. The AGO exhibition “Anthony Caro: Sculpture Laid Bare” is kicked off with a panel on December 9 at 6 p.m. that is introduced by Caro’s son and includes Caro’s former studio assistants. Worth noting: December 8 is also the first official day for Francis Alÿs‘s show at the gallery.

On December 9 from 6 to 9 p.m., Cooper Cole hosts a book launch for Andrew James Paterson’s Collected/Corrected, which includes new poems, scripts of videos and four fictocriticism texts. There is also a three-day exhibition of Paterson’s work being held in conjunction with the new publication from December 8 to 10. “Art & Inactivism,” a new exhibition by Mitchell F. Chan, questions art’s historical voice in public political discourse, as well as comment-section flame-wars, and a variety of other topics. Three new installations present the theme at Angell Gallery starting on December 10 from 2 to 4 p.m. Ongoing at the Gladstone Hotel’s Art Hut—a donut shop turned art space—until December 18, is Justin de Lima’s “First Gentrification,” a solo show that navigates the material remnants of urbanity, meditating on the intersections of gentrification, immigration and first-generation identity.

From 7 to 10 p.m. on December 8, Xpace Cultural Centre will host the third annual art auction fundraiser for Girls Art League. GAL is a Toronto-based arts organization with an aim to empower all girls and women through the visual arts. This event will include the works of artists like Audrey Assad, Jessica Karuhanga, Ness Lee, Shellie Zhang and Yan Wen Chang. “Get Noticed,” an exhibition curated by Marianne Katzman and Richard Rhodes, opens at Red Head Gallery with a reception December 9 from 6 to 8 p.m. including work by Gord Peteran, Kristine Mifsud and others. Inspired by work in call centres and office environments, Gael Patino‘s “We Will Return Your Call” opens December 9 at 3 p.m. at Gallery 50.

December 10 is the final day to catch “Ydessa Hendeles: Death to Pigs” at Barbara Edwards Contemporary—read our review to find out why you should go.

Edmonton

Craig Le Blanc will be launching his catalogue She Loves Me. He Loves Me Not. at dc3 Art Projects on December 9 from 7 to 10 p.m. The event will take place in conjunction to the gallery’s year-end holiday party.

Montreal

The SBC Gallery of Contemporary Art’s “Putting Rehearsals to the Test,” a show featuring over 50 international artists including Rashid Masharawi, Harun Farocki and Jutta Koether as they address their positions on contemporary art and media, will close on December 10. Join Romeo Gongora for a public artist talk at the Diagonale on December 8 at 6 p.m. Recently returned from Rio de Janeiro as part of Diagonale’s Research Residency, a project to support artists that use fiber both in material and metaphorical senses, Gongora will present his research from the past month.

As part of the Darling Foundry’s international artist residency, Vadodara-based Indian artistSashikant Thavudoz, Luxembourg artist Claudia Passeri, Paris-based Stéphanie Lagarde, will be presenting artist talks from 6 to 8 p.m. at the space proper.

MC Marquis offers cheeky hand-painted vintage plates and kitschy embroidered tapestries that references to Québécois slang and pop culture. Catch them at the opening at Station 16 during a reception on December 8 at 6 p.m. K8 Hardy‘s Outfitumentary screens December 13 at 6:30 p.m. at the Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery. New work by Lyne Bastien is celebrated with a reception at Beaux-arts des Amériques on December 8 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Quebec City

Finnish artist Kenneth Bamberg opens at new show December 14 at VU. His topic? it relates to his longtime fanship of the Quebec Nordiques, and re-inserting team imagery into the local landscape.

Kelowna

Fans of large-scale drawing will want to check out works created by eight local artists in “Drawing from Life,” opening December 9 at the Kelowna Art Gallery. Newly commissioned works by artists David Alexander, Rose Braun, Jane Everett, Wanda Lock, Amy Modahl, Gary Pearson, Sage Sidley and Johann Wessels will all be on view.

Calgary

Join Lisa Baldissera for a curator’s tour December 10 at 1 p.m. at Contemporary Calgary‘s NEXT2016. Lindsay Sorell and Jayda Karsten are among those presenting. Peter von Tiesenhausen‘s “The Watchers — 20 Years Later” continues at Jarvis Hall Gallery, revisiting a cross-country journey and artwork the artist made two decades ago.

New York-based Canadian artist Rachel Beach is opening her first major exhibition in this country in a decade. A collaboration with Saint Mary’s University Art Gallery in Halifax, “Rachel Beach: Mid-Sentence” will be presented at Confederation Centre Art Gallery starting on December 10 through April 30, bringing the artist back to the Maritimes, where she was originally trained. Join the artist for a tour of the show December 10 at 7 p.m.

North Bay

The artist-run White Water Gallery will close its second annual show, “Upping the Ante” on December 10, with a gala on December 9 from 5 to 7 p.m. Featuring multiple Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, this exhibition showcases contemporary Indigenous art, including a rawhide piece mounted by Aanmitaagzi, alongside anti-colonial art by settler artists, in order to (re)negotiate ways of existing and transforming together.

Regina

“Saturnalia IV,” featuring ceramics by Zane Wilcox, beading by Barbara Boyer, works by Zachari Logan and more, opens at Slate Fine Art on December 9 from 5 to 8 p.m.

Our weekly must-sees, published each Thursday, are chosen from opening and event announcements sent to preview@canadianart.ca at least two days prior to publication. For listings of art openings, exhibitions and events, visit canadianart.ca/exhibitions.


 Image: Vanessa Brown in her workshop   INTERVIEW PART I LINK HERE:    http://www.volumesproject.com/new-blog//artist-interview-series-vanessa-brown

Image: Vanessa Brown in her workshop

INTERVIEW PART I LINK HERE:

http://www.volumesproject.com/new-blog//artist-interview-series-vanessa-brown

VOLUMES PROJECT | Artist Interview Series: Vanessa Brown | PART I

November 08, 2016

One of the best parts of working on an initiative like the Volumes Project is the incredible number of artists you meet, all of whom have been eager to tell their story and support in any way possible. As we continue to build our VP network, we’re excited to introduce you to some of these incredible artists that are following their passion here in Vancouver. 

For the second post in our artist interview series, we sat down with Vanessa Brown in her East Vancouver studio. Here’s what she had to share with VP:
                                  
VP: Tell us a bit about yourself and your career as an artist so far.
VB: I’m a Vancouver-based artist. I attended Emily Carr University of Art + Design and graduated in 2013. Since then I’ve worked hard to maintain an active practice, which has meant balancing a number of different day jobs and responsibilities with studio time. I have exhibited in Germany, Montreal, Toronto, Seattle, and Vancouver. I got really into sculpture in the third year of my BFA, and took advantage of the metal shop at my school. Working with metal was one of the first times that a material ever sang to me and generated so many ideas. The material tells me where it wants to go and lets me know its possibilities.
                    
VP: Why have you chosen to live and work in Vancouver? What makes you stay here?
VB: This question is always on the front of my mind. I had reasons to move to Vancouver, even before I went to art school. I was living in Montreal and used to be a social worker/ mental health case manager there. I came to Vancouver to work in the hospital system, and then I decided to attend art school. Vancouver is a beautiful city, I have family and friends here, it has an active art scene and engaged community, but I don’t know if I will always choose to stay here. I often think about leaving, and a lot of that has to do with affordability. The idea of buying a house is completely out of the question, but what is really frightening to me is how difficult - nearly impossible - it is to find rental space.
                    
VP: What have been your biggest challenges as an artist? Tell us about any struggles you’ve had finding a studio.
VB: Everything is expensive. A lot of buildings have stipulations - you can be a jeweler with a soldering kit, but you can’t weld. Or you can’t use oil paints. There are a lot of studio spaces out there without industrial sinks. I got really lucky - I wanted to see if it would be possible to continue working in metal and since I’ve been here at The Vancouver Community Lab the workshop has really evolved. The tools and the capacity for what we can do has grown and built itself up over the years. It’s amazing what kind of space we’ve been able to make it into. If I didn’t have this space, then I couldn’t work the way I do.
                    
VP: Describe your current studio space.
VB: My current studio is run as a community space . There are semi-private rooms upstairs and downstairs, and there is a big workshop. We have metal working facilities, woodworking facilities, an outdoor space with a tent that we use as a spray booth, and we also have a textile area. Even though it isn’t easy for me to afford it, my studio and workshop are very reasonably priced. It has great value. There is no way that I could have done metal fabrication in my previous studio. I can make noise if I need to, I can create dust if I need to. The fact that this kind of creation can still take place in the city means that there is more diversity in our creative industry. There are also a lot of people with tons of knowledge at the Vancouver Community Lab and everyone is very generous with it.
                    
VP: How does having a great workspace benefit you?
VB: More than anything, the studio gives me more freedom to think about how I want to work rather than having the work decided for me. Space, or lack of it, can determine one’s art practice. For example, if I didn’t have the Vancouver Community Lab, then the option of working in metal would be off the table for me; I wouldn’t be able to afford it. I would probably pursue digital collage, which doesn’t require as much studio space or technical facilities. I believe that cities which lack affordable, diverse work spaces produce a more homogenized art scene. The homogeneity might be in what tends to get made, or more likely in the kind person who gets to access larger, technical spaces. I can’t stress enough how important accessibility (financial and otherwise) is –not just for individuals but for the entire art ecosystem. If we value diversity in an art community, then it is vital for a diverse range of people to access spaces in which they can produce.
                
To see examples of Vanessa’s work, visit her website at http://vanessa-brown.com/.     


 Image: Vanessa Brown in her workshop   INTERVIEW PART II LINK HERE:   http://www.volumesproject.com/artist-series//vanessa-brown-artist-series-interview

Image: Vanessa Brown in her workshop

INTERVIEW PART II LINK HERE:

http://www.volumesproject.com/artist-series//vanessa-brown-artist-series-interview

VOLUMES PROJECT | Artist Interview Series: Vanessa Brown | PART II

December 29, 2016

Name: Vanessa Brown

Studio: The Vancouver Community Lab

Website: vanessa-brown.com                                                                      

#1: Describe your ideal studio space in three words.

Large, welcoming, windows            

#2: What is your favourite gallery or artist run centre to visit in the city?

That’s hard to choose. I’m pretty excited about Pablo de Ocampo’s programming at the Western Front. I’m really looking forward to seeing Olivia Whetung’s work in conversation with Lis Rhodes’s. I also love visiting project spaces in artist studios. These shows are usually put on by the artist and/or their friends with no budget, just the labour that the individual or community can muster, which often comes from an invested, sincere place                

#3. If you could change one thing about living and working as an artist in Vancouver, what would it be?

Affordability.


 Image: Vanesa Brown. Ovule, 2016.   LINK TO ARTIST SERIES HERE:    http://www.theacornrestaurant.ca/the-acorn-artist-series/

Image: Vanesa Brown. Ovule, 2016.

LINK TO ARTIST SERIES HERE:

http://www.theacornrestaurant.ca/the-acorn-artist-series/

The Acorn Artist Series

The Acorn Artist Series shines a light on artists in Vancouver whose work we admire greatly and wish to proliferate in our own humble way.  Every month or so we make a new artist card that gets handed out to our guests at the end of their dining experience.  Our hopes are that they take it home as a memento of the Acorn but also as a foray into what is being created by some of our city's finest emerging artists. 


 Image: Vanessa Brown. Fox Hunt, 2016. From Instalment No 17 at MOLAF   LINK HERE:    http://www.molaf.org/

Image: Vanessa Brown. Fox Hunt, 2016. From Instalment No 17 at MOLAF

LINK HERE:

http://www.molaf.org/

The Museum of Longing and Failure

The Museum of Longing and Failure is a collecting entity that seeks to reveal the visual terrain of its thematic concern. Its form takes shape through a sustained conversation with living artists and collectives, whose contributed sculptural works form the basis of ongoing installations and interventions. Through presentation, production, and publishing, the MOLAF strives to constantly question its own structure, identity, and capacity to both support its collection and generate new forms.


 Image: Vanessa Brown's The Hand of Camille   LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:    http://vancouverisawesome.com/2016/10/12/speaking-volumes-with-your-hands/

Image: Vanessa Brown's The Hand of Camille

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:

http://vancouverisawesome.com/2016/10/12/speaking-volumes-with-your-hands/

VIA | Speaking Volumes With Your Hands, review by Sunshine Frere

By Sunshine Frere

October 12, 2016

Amongst a tsunami of communication, what voices make it through? What histories are revealed and what is left untold?

Artist Vanessa Brown has several stories to share with you. Pull yourself away from the busy hubbub of the city and head over to Hastings Street to spend some contemplative time with Brown’s solo exhibition entitled the Hand of Camille at Wil Aballe Art Projects.

The steel sculptures in The Hand of Camille may have been produced over the past year, but the story behind each object predates the work itself by centuries. The exhibition swirls viewers into a recursive meditation on the complexities of value and authenticity. Brown’s exhibition also explores art history as well as gender and labour politics.

The artist works intuitively with her materials, her hands and body shaping work as she goes. The resulting sculptures are stunning objects, the exhibition is a must see!

The history of steel is most industrious, loaded with heavy-industry iconography. When one thinks of steel, the mind projects forth images of skyscrapers, railroads, engines, and bridges. Hard edged, sharp, solid and heavy. Can steel be something ‘other’? Can it look and feel like ribbon or paper? Can it occupy a different state; a more embodied one where its’ malleable and pliable qualities are more apparent? These are but a few of the questions that Brown has been working through as she continues to work with steel in her practice.

Brown is hyper-aware of the hand of the artist as she has worked as both artist and installer for other artists over the years. Where would Rembrandt be without his studio assistants to paint drapery, where would Damian Hirst be without his butterfly painting studio technicians? Where would Rodin be without Camille Claudel who sculpted many aspects of his sculptures. Brown specifically references Camille’s hand in the exhibition as Claudel’s work and life-story resonates with Brown’s life and practice.

As Brown researched Claudel’s life-story, the research, Brown’s work history and art practice converged in many ways. What emerged was this exhibition where the divisions between craft, hobby, design, art, and sculpture are muddled. Brown also meditates on the differences and similarities between artist, assistant, technician and craftsperson. This reflects back through some of the aesthetic pairings and juxtapositions in the exhibition.

Brown returns continuously to the idea of claiming space, a key concept underpins many ideas in the work. Camille Claudel fought to claim space as a female in a male dominated sculpture realm in the 1800-1900’s. Although some conditions for female artists have improved, many preconceived ideas and challenges remain. Having a voice as a female sculptor has also worked its way into the works consciously and subconsciously. Today, Brown also claims space in the present for her personal artist practice, one that is separate from her ‘day job’ in the arts. Another fascinating claiming of space by the artist is that of the physicality and ownership of labour in her work, it is an embodied practice. Brown makes sculptures that are: of, for, and from the body.

There are many beautiful gestures in this exhibition.

The artist preserved the trace of a hand that rolled a few meters of ribbon in one sculpture. A silent and visible trace of invisible labour. Brown also highlighted her hand in the production and process by incorporating Ultracal casts of her fingertips in one work, and her whole hand in another.

The exhibition installation resembles a fixed-point perspective composition, one where our eyes are centrally drawn to the key sculpture titled The Eternal Idol: The Left Hand, The Right Hand. Brown’s sculptures are three dimensional, but often speak of flatness. Each work is set up so that it is staggered one after the other, like layers of a collage, or cascading mountains in a landscape. But on the horizon, it is not the sun captivating our attention, we are drawn to a pair of hands, that are flat, fractured and larger than life. The fragments/ligatures also resemble a shadow of two figures, linked together in a monochromatic wash and fixed in place, upright.

We should listen more to our hands. In gestures, a multitude of insight is revealed.

Vanessa Brown’s exhibition The Hand of Camille closes on October 22nd.

For more exhibition information visit: http://www.waapart.com/. To visit the exhibition head to: Wil Aballe Art Projects (WAAP): 688 East Hastings. WAAP is open from Tuesday – Saturday 11am-5pm or by appointment.

For more information about Vanessa Brown visit: http://vanessa-brown.com


 Image: Out of Sight 2016   LINK HERE:    http://www.outofsight.space/artistlist/

Image: Out of Sight 2016

LINK HERE:

http://www.outofsight.space/artistlist/

OUT OF SIGHT 2016

When local billionaire Paul Allen announced that his company Vulcan was creating the inaugural year of the Seattle Art Fair, everyone in the city was abuzz with excitement. Where would it be? Who was going to exhibit?Would it bring out of town art collectors into Seattle? Would it shine a spotlight on the creative brilliance that ran deep throughout the Pacific Northwest?


It was that last question that inspired local curator Greg Lundgren to create a satellite exhibit specific to showcasing a broad and ambitious portrait of contemporary art in the Pacific Northwest—a region defined as Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and British Columbia. No one knew if the Seattle Art Fair was going to successfully draw the art dealers, patrons and writers to the Emerald City, but it was a risk worth taking—if the spotlight was shone on our city, Lundgren didn’t want our region’s artists to be spectators to the fair—he wanted to underline that we had a world-class inventory of our own. 

The Seattle Art Fair was to be held in the Century Link Convention Center located on the southern edge of downtown Seattle. In the economic boom that Seattle is undergoing, finding a large uninhabited space can be a tall order. Lundgren approached a couple dream spaces but time was ticking by and he still hadn't nailed down a lease. The summer was approaching. There was so much work to do. And then a bit of magic happened. Lundgren ran into Dan Milhalyo and Annie Hann, the artist/architect team that comprises Lead Pencil Studios, as well as long standing friends (Lundgren and Milhalyo were in grade school together). Expressing his frustration at not nailing down a space, Dan and Annie casually mentioned a space that he might check out as an alternative. It was close to the convention center and as far as they knew, open to the possibility of short term cultural programming. It was the top floor of King Street Station. Who knew King Street Station even had a top floor? Turns out hardly no one—it hadn’t had a tenant in over six decades.

Dan and Annie emailed pictures of the space and passed along their contact at Seattle Department of Transportation—managers to the building. Lundgren reached out, continued his research of the space and his excitement grew. King Street Station was built in 1902 and inspired by the San Marcos Clock Tower in Venice, Italy. It was also designed by the same architects that were responsible for Grand Central Station in Manhattan. And it housed 22,000 square feet of open space, with soaring ceilings and hand-forged metal beams. It was, or at least could become, the perfect exhibition space. And the Seattle Art Fair was less than three months away.


Lundgren reached out to Matthew Richter, who manages and facilitates art spaces for the city’s Office of Arts&Culture. Matt made a few phone calls, met with SDOT, and within the week Lundgren was negotiating the terms of a temporary lease. And after lawyers and insurance agents and city officials all had their say, a deal was struck, and Lundgren had the keys. 


With only six weeks until the Seattle Art Fair he called on Sierra Stinson, Kirsten Anderson and Sharon Arnold— all ambitious, smart, well connected, and independent Seattle-based curators to co-curate the event. What was it going to be called? Out of Sight. And then the real work began. In that time Vital 5 Productions built out 500 feet of temporary walls, installed 900 feet of track lighting, painted and re-imagined and upgraded the electrical grid. Lundgren, Stinson, Anderson, and Arnold pulled together 110 artists to exhibit that first year. It was a marathon, but one that paid off. It brought them all to near exhaustion, but it succeeded in it’s mission—to show that the Pacific Northwest was brimming with talent. 

 —Greg Lundgren, June 2016

Located at 115 South Jackson Street, Out of Sight occupies three floors of the historic Schoenfelds' building in Pioneer Square. Spanning over 18,000 square feet, the exhibition space is one block North from the Seattle Art Fair at the Century Link Convention Center.


 Image: Vanessa Brown. Study for a Garden, 2016   LINK TO SITE HERE:    http://www.hauntgallery.ca/planepotpatternrepose/

Image: Vanessa Brown. Study for a Garden, 2016

LINK TO SITE HERE:

http://www.hauntgallery.ca/planepotpatternrepose/

Plane, pot, pattern, repose at HAUNT

HAUNT presents Plane, pot, pattern, repose featuring a large-scale canvas work by Vanessa Brown and poetry by Sheryda Warrener. The event is the second in a series of interdisciplinary exhibitions taking place in a home basement space on Glen Drive in Vancouver, Canada.“Vanessa Brown: Plane, pot, pattern, repose” by Lucien Durey

Once an indigenous trail, once a colonial wagon road. This hundred-year-old house was built on a heterogeneous glacial deposit of clay, silt, sand and stones, shortly after Kingsway was paved. The concrete floor: a daddy longlegs’ stomping ground, poured around the mid-seventies, cruel to falling glassware, sloping westward. We painted the gallery portion “Cat’s Paw” some months ago to cover its battered grey, which was consistent throughout the basement save for the outlined shape of a single bed in the northeast corner. A mattress evidently held by built-in platform, or perhaps just very heavy, now somewhere among other outmoded features that have been removed: cupboards, closets, carpets. Near the alley door, where the wood paneling abruptly ends, the electrical outlets are labeled on the breaker box as Freezer 1 and Freezer 2. Teenage bedroom, entryway, cold storage. Quite cold: concrete that stays cool on hot summer nights—a room that demands slippers.

Vanessa Brown’s Plane, pot, pattern, repose considered most practically, is a reprieve from chilled cellar for stockinged feet. A painting and an area rug, it asks us to admire and make use of it, the first of its several oppositions. From a distance, full views of a tessellating pattern are interrupted by the work’s functionality as a surface for reclining bodies. Up close, with the rug under us, we stare into milk-in-coffee patterns of acrylic ink on raw canvas. It’s a precarious terracotta pot stack, tilting slightly, yet laid out gently—a painting in repose. Amphora, chalice and oinochoe shapes discovered amidst ubiquitous flat-bottom flower vessels: like finding George Ohr ceramic works buried on the shelves of a home and garden centre. Most importantly, a site, created with the explicit purpose of hosting live events. Tonight, a reading by Sheryda Warrener from her new book of poetry, Floating is Everything, calls us up from basements, through telescopes, hurling us outward toward asymmetric spiral galaxies. In a few weeks, an interactive performance with tuned handbells by Vanessa Brown will be a lounging and listening event. At exhibition close, we’ll fold the space, place it into a box for storage—once gathering page, now unfolding, occasional spot.


Vanessa Brown works in sculpture, painting and photography and is based in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish Territories. She graduated with a BFA from Emily Carr University in 2013 and was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award. She has exhibited in Canada and in Germany. Her recent exhibitions include Quoting the Quotidian at Wil Aballe Art Projects, The Oasis at FIELD Contemporary, Visitors at Gallery 295 and Walking and Falling Falling and Walking Walking and Falling at Erin Stump Projects.

Sheryda Warrener is the author of two poetry collections, including her debut Hard Feelings (Snare/Invisible, 2010). Her work has been shortlisted for the Robert Kroetsch Award for Innovative Poetry, the Arc Magazine Poem of the Year, the Malahat Review Long Poem Prize, and was a runner-up for Lemon Hound’s inaugural poetry contest. She lives in Vancouver, where she teaches at the University of British Columbia.


Gallery 295: Vanessa Brown

VISITORS
Vanessa Brown
Light Box Project Space

Gallery 295

295 East 2 Avenue, Vancouver

August 28 - December 5, 2015
Opening Reception: August 28th, 7-9PM

Moving from a sculptural practice into a two-dimensional image, Vanessa Brown presents us with a gestural investigation in the way she builds on her understanding of visual and sculptural planes. In Visitors, we are faced with the monolithic flatness of an image space compounded by the gestural removal of negative space. Substituting a selection tool for a plasma-cutter and a solid colour space for sheet steel, Brown flattens her sculptural practice even further into the photographic plane and presents it at a scale that relates to a sculptural relationship to the body.

Brown highlights the sculptural element that the photographic image can claim in how images present physical space as a composition of planes through a certain forced uni-focal perspective. In generating a work for the Light-Box Project Space, Brown recognizes that the tools of digital photographic software mirror those that she uses when working with sculpture. Brown is compelled to leave traces of the tools she used, keeping the gesture of her unsteady hand recorded uncorrected. She does so overtop a series of images taken from a visit to Waimea Canyon, Kauai, presenting the 6th iteration within the light-box itself. On this island Brown takes an understanding of the landscape from her sculptural practice into the realm of the photographic act. For Brown, the monolithic blue void that blocks our view parallels her removal from the scene and her circumstantial inability to enjoy the serene beauty. Brown considers this simultaneous attraction to and removal from a location parallel to the methodological flow of translating a sculptural practice to one that is located in digital photo collage.



VANESSA BROWN is a Vancouver-based artist who works predominantly in sculpture and painting. She graduated with a BFA from Emily Carr University in 2013 and was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award. She has exhibited in Canada and in Germany. Her recent exhibitions include Wil Aballe Art Projects, FIELD Contemporary, and Erin Stump Projects.

Shown: Visitors 6, 2015.
Vanessa Brown
Light-Jet chromogenic print on DuraTrans, 48” x 72”.


 Image: Vanessa Brown.  Swiss Cheese , 2015.   LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:    http://akimbo.ca/akimblog/?id=1041

Image: Vanessa Brown. Swiss Cheese, 2015.

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:

http://akimbo.ca/akimblog/?id=1041

AKIMBO |  The Oasis, review by Steffanie LIng

Currently installed at Field Contemporary is The Oasis, a three-hole mini golf course designed by local artists Vanessa Brown, Steve Hubert, and Allison Tweedie, with a Pro Shop stocked by Mark DeLong. Visitors are encouraged to “Come play!” 

Hubert’s Wall Rider seems to be a bricolage of the artist studio, but beyond this valley of cardboard is the story of a bodily function. In your ball’s way are a nonchalantly placed empty beer bottle, a shallow fountain gently streaming yellow tinted water, and the hole for the ball itself (a red American party cup). Brown’s Swiss Cheese abuts flat curvaceous shapes with copper tubing accents. This hole channels its respective artist’s sensibilities most directly. In this sense, it could still pass as an autonomously fabricated sculpture beyond the hyper-specific conditions of this exhibition. Tweedie’s collage compositions form the backdrop of Part of a Whole: yes, it is a pun, but perhaps it alludes to how this artist who works predominantly in drawing and paper collage is a team player in this sculpturally demanding context. 


In the Pro Shop, Delong’s marker drawings are reproduced like a logo on t-shirts and mugs, which can be sold at pedestrian prices. The retail aspect is a bit of a farce, though these blatant commodities are included in a pricelist along with each artist’s hole. Within a commercial art gallery, such gestures might start as ironic critiques and end in fallacy, but the irony seems lost in the project’s sincere attempt to simply “re-create the atmosphere of those summer evenings.” 

It’s a “summer show” – a casual term applied to exhibitions marking the winding down of a certain kind of rigor that’s apparently exercised exclusively in the winter months. Usually summer shows are fun and nice. It’s free to play, but the true cost might be the suspension of your summer intellect. However, it is summer and Field Contemporary wants you to have fun, so I left the gallery and found my way to a go-cart track. 


Field Contemporary: http://www.field-contemporary.com/ 
The Oasis continues until August 22. 


Steffanie Ling's essays, criticism, and art writing have been published alongside exhibitions, in print, and online in Canada and the United States. She is the editor of Bartleby Review, an occasional pamphlet of criticism and writing in Vancouver, and a curator at CSA Space. She is Akimblog’s Vancouver correspondent and can be followed on Twitter and Instagram @steffbao.


Walking and falling at Erin Stump Ptojects

Colleen Heslin and Vanessa Brown
walking and falling
falling and walking
walking and falling

March 21 - April 18 , 2015 Opens: Saturday March 21st, 2-6pm

ESP is pleased to present a two-person exhibition of new work by Colleen Heslin and Vanessa Brown. Working in tandem from two separate cities, both artists’ work share an interest in abstraction with echoes of modernism, re-working and cycling material off-cuts into new projects. For each artist, new forms are generated through cutting material, collage, assemblage, and working with both positive and negative space. The material qualities of metal and fabric generate a curious cross over, where metal subsumes a fragility and stretched fabric becomes concrete.

The poetic cadence of the exhibition title calls on lyrics from Laurie Anderson, describing walking as repeated gestures of falling and catching yourself in your next step. This lyrical sentiment reflects on both artist’s studio practices and their on-going working relationships with materials in their work. Heslin’s abstract use of domestic fibres mimics a photographic print-like quality, formed with simple dying and staining mechanics, the effect of which prompts questions of digital production. Brown’s metal sculptures possess a paper-like quality in form through construction. Her use of colour brings forward painterly qualities while her forms maintain a tension through her use of layering flat planes. Loosely echoing each other’s process, Heslin and Brown have shared images, patterns, and texts to create work that volleys back and forth across practices and disciplines.

Colleen Heslin is an artist and independent curator based in Vancouver and Montreal. With an MFA in painting from Concordia University and a BFA in photography from Emily Carr University, Heslin’s work explores medium crossovers between painting, sculpture, fibres and photography. Her work has been exhibited and published in Canada, USA, and Europe with recent solo exhibitions of new work in Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto. Heslin was the winner of the 2013 RBC Painting Competition.

Vanessa Brown is a Vancouver-based artist who works predominantly in sculpture and painting. She graduated with a BFA from Emily Carr University in 2013 and was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award. She recently participated in The Universe and Other Systems residency at the Banff Centre (2014) and has exhibited throughout Canada and in Germany.


    Image: N I R D V A N D V A Installation View,  Babel Tower, Untitled 4, Untitled 10 , Kuh Del Rosario and Scott Lewis, 2014  LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:   http://www.vancouversun.com/entertainment/Best+2014+Visual+arts/10667697/story.html

 

Image: N I R D V A N D V A Installation View, Babel Tower, Untitled 4, Untitled 10, Kuh Del Rosario and Scott Lewis, 2014

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:

http://www.vancouversun.com/entertainment/Best+2014+Visual+arts/10667697/story.html

VANCOUVER SUN | The Best of 2014: Visual Arts, by Kevin Griffin

My list of the city’s top art exhibitions are listed chronologically and not in terms of importance. There is a mixture of exhibitions at big galleries and smaller ones, public and private. I have to say that judging from the exhibitions I saw, the art world in Vancouver was vibrant and exciting in 2014.

Nirdvandva at Field Contemporary

Curated by Vanessa Brown, this exhibition featured sculptures by Kuh Del Rosario and paintings by Scott Lewis, both of which looked as if they were in the process of transformation. It also takes the prize for the most unusual title of the year. Nirdvandva is not a typo for Nirvana. It’s a Sanskrit word meaning a person’s ability to be free from dualities.

Orchestra of the Uncanny Valley at Vivo Media Arts

Artist Dinka Pignon’s work explored the uncanny valley, the term used to describe the gap between the human and nearly human in digital technology. Pignon projected video on to mannequins and multiple translucent screens to create a sense of space and three dimensionality without funny 3-D glasses. It also had a killer soundscape of sound and spoken word that looked back to the origins of 20th century art avant gardes.

Artifake at Macaulay Fine Art

A trickster of indigenous art, Shawn Hunt continued his exploration of the space where contemporary art and Northwest Coast traditions overlap. One of the standouts for me was Odalisque, a sculptural figure from the past of western art made from leftover arms, legs and other sculptural parts Hunt found in his studio and those of his father’s and brother’s, both of whom are Northwest Coast artists.

Lost in the Memory Palace at the Vancouver Art Gallery

It’s rare for a work to affect me so powerfully that it made me cry but that’s what happened when I first saw Opera for a Small Room, one of the several works in Lost in the Memory Palace by Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller. Using a unique combination of sounds and installations, the couple created open-ended works that allowed viewers to wander and get lost in their own narratives.

Thru the Trapdoor at Vivo Media Arts/On Main

A unique one-of-a-kind exhibition by artistic director Paul Wong and producer Rick Erickson, Thru the Trapdoor took place in the basement of 1965 Main. In a rabbit-warren of 603 sq. m of corridors and cubicles, more than 50 artists exhibited and performed works. It was an art exhibition, party, journey and total experience. It was the first exhibition where I got lost wandering around art.

Other highlights

The paintings of Tyler Toews in Freestyle at Back Gallery Project; the public art work Deadhead by Cedric Bomford in collaboration with his brother Nathan and their father Jim in Heritage Harbour; the sculptural works in Let’s Sit Down and Talk by Marie Khouri at Equinox Gallery; and the public art works Headlines and Movie Last Lines by Stefan Brüggemann at Contemporary Art Gallery and Time to Let Go by Babak Golkar at VAG’s Offsite.

kevingriffin@vancouversun.com


 Image: Moon Room, Installation view at Narwhal   LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:    https://www.tusslemagazine.com/moonroom

Image: Moon Room, Installation view at Narwhal

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:

https://www.tusslemagazine.com/moonroom

TUSSLE MAGAZINE | Lunar Magic, review by Laura Horne-Gaul

October 27th, 2014

Moon Room at Narwhal Art Projects is the second exhibition curated by  Kristin Weckworth that has incorporated a large number of artists. Moon Room includes 21 artists. In 2010 Weckworth's exhibition titled, The Dazzle, Cabinet of Wonder, 27 artists were included.

Moon Room is comprised of two rooms and a sculpture in the front window of the galleries new location on Dundas West. The space is divided by an homage to the children's classic Goodnight Moon(Margaret Wise Brown/Clement Hurd 1947)  in the South room and in the North room to the Moon.

The sculpture in the front window of the exhibitiontitled, Ouroborous Holding the Moon, 2014 by Vanessa Brown brings the exhibition into perspective with its delicate construct. Cyclicality, the sense of something constantly transforming itself, an eternal return, a force that cannot be extinguished, the Moon.

Upon entering the gallery you are presented with another Moon, a mural painted with acrylics by Alicia Nauta titled, Goodnight Moon,2014. This is the first mural completed by Nauta. The Mural spans the entire wall and is an interpretation of the cover image for the children's classic book Goodnight Moon. The homage toGoodnight Moon reveals itself further with a representative table of the brush and the bowl of mush titled, Aside the Table, by Nikki Woolsey. Heather Goodchild's tapestry titled, and the evening and the morning, hanging on the wall shares inspired scenes while Naomi Yasui’s, Untitled, stoneware rug/vessel sculpture sits ethereally on the floor in the foreground. The remaining works are abstract paintings conservatively hung which personify characters from the classic and of course the fired ceramic clocks by Eunice Luk titled, it's only five after ten.

The first Moon you encounter, among many, in the North room  is a painting by Margaux Williamson titled, Lunar Eclipse (I was the worst one), a definitive study of the Moon in oils completed in 2014. This room’s walls are painted black and are saturated with art, it feels somewhat like an inner sanctum as you are enclosed and transported. While all of the works are related to the Moon and its powers not all are purely figurative. Eli Langer's bright gel pen on paper works are evocative of intergalactic space waves and Patrick Krzyzanowski’s scratchpad pieces (which were created by attaching the scratching tools to his pet rat's exercise wheel) exude pure luminescence congruent to that of the Moon.Krzyzanowski’s and Langer's works are conclusively hung throughout the room to tie in the rest of the more figurative pieces which range from exquisitely detailed and executed graphite drawings, stained glass, collage, photography and painting.


Moon Room emits mystery and magic, engaging the powers that be. 

-Laura Horne-Gaul

Moon Room @ Narwhal Contemporary


 Image: Alicia Nauta.  Goodnight Moon , 2014  LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:   http://narwhalcontemporary.com/moon-room-review-artoronto/

Image: Alicia Nauta. Goodnight Moon, 2014

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:

http://narwhalcontemporary.com/moon-room-review-artoronto/

ARTTORONTO.CA | Moon Room, review by Josephine Mwanvua

Upon entering Moon Room, one notices the living room inspired setting of the space, and a peak of the black walls of the neighbouring room. Both spaces are divided by a massive, whimsical mural, which happens to be the centerpiece of the entire exhibit. The mural is a perspective rendering of a living room, with a big window that looks out onto the moon and the starry night sky. You are engulfed in this made-up space, immediately following along the narrative, and when you step beyond the painted window, you have entered space and experiencing the moon through several perspectives. Kristin Weckworth, the curator for Narwhal, got the idea for Moon Room after having watched a documentary titled Room 237 (a film exploring conspiracies within Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining). Drawing inspiration from one of the explored conspiracies and relating it to humanity’s ancient and scientific theories of the moon, Weckworth brought together a group of artists she thought could make an interesting and harmonious constellation.

The, mural, entitled Goodnight, Moon, acts as the medium between the rooms. It does its job perfectly because it speaks loud and clear to the viewer, making it the first thing to be noticed. It communicates its message very well, because it is very easy to pick up on the concept of both rooms, being that the first room has white walls just like in the mural, and the second space has black walls, just like the dark sky outside of the window. Alicia Nauta, a printmaker, who created the piece, loves working with analog images and makes a lot of Xerox collages. This piece was originally a collage as well and is based on a popular 1940’s children’s book of the same title. Aside from its ominous presence, the piece also holds a certain strangeness to it because the perspective of the room does not correlate with the actual perspective of the gallery space. This causes the viewer to become a bit more aware of their relationship to the space.

One of the art pieces in the second room is Adrienne Kammerer’s The Infernal Eternal: a large landscape graphite rendering with a sci-fi inspired theme. Kammerer loves listening to sci-fi audio books while drawing, and she let her imagination guide her when creating this piece. For this work in particular, she wanted to produce a large landscape unusual for her because she typically makes small portrait style drawings. Kammerer’s beautiful scenery is an open-ended story left for interpretation. To me, it is the last-man standing on a post-apocalyptic moon, a few years after humanity had decided to inhibit it.

Text and photo: Josephine Mwanvua


TORONTO STAR | Art reviews: Joseph Tisiga at Diaz Contemporary and Moon Room at Narwhal Projects, by Murray Whyte

A First Nations' artist treads treacherous ground in his solo debut, and Moon Room's broad gaze captures beauty all around.'

Sun. Nov 2nd, 2014, by Murray Whyte

You'll find a lot things familiar about the work of Joseph Tisiga, which is on exhaustive display at Diaz Contemporary until mid-month, which is a little odd about an artist so unique. Then again, that's the trick that Tisiga plays so well, flicking at the recognizable while taking you somewhere new.

Tisiga, 30, who lives and works in Whitehorse, has shown infrequently, but at a handful of high-profile venues (his work at the Mass MOCA extravaganza “Oh Canada” a couple of years ago was a highlight for me), so it comes as a mild surprise that this is his first-ever solo show of any kind. At Diaz, some two dozen watercolours line the walls of the main gallery, with a half-dozen paint and collage works in the back. Throughout, neatly hewn logs painted to look like outsize cigarettes lean clustered in corners or lay prone on the floor.

Here's where the familiar part comes in. In the paintings, Tisiga plies a territory that lies somewhere naivist drawing and dark comic fantasy, a strategy that worked well enough for Winnipegger Marcel Dzama, say, to make him one of the most prominent artists working in the world today.

Tisiga's frame isn't limited to dark childhood terrors, though, and his background as a member of the Kaska Dene First Nation informs much of his work here. The temptation to read it as whimsical is strong — an oblique title, The Sacred Game: Escape is Perpetual, offers little guidance — but don't mistake dark, pointed humour for whimsy.

Tisiga's priorities, as an Aboriginal artist with a bone to pick, may be leavened by a wry impulse – something he shares with Canada's best-known Aboriginal artists, Brian Jungen – but his position is just as clear. In “Sweetened by False Generosity,” a watercolour, a man is shown roasting something over an open fire fed by various ceremonial headdresses and totems of a distinctly Haida aesthetic. In “Tune for a Spectacle,” a naked Indian sits at a piano in a room festooned with a mural of a mountain scene. His back is to the audience, while a decidedly English-looking, well-groomed chap in a red coat puts the finishing touches on a puppet show.

Make of it what you will, but here's my take: Tisiga's concern is with the historic and ongoing heroic fetishization of the indigenous from an aesthetic point of view. He's making fun, and making a point: That culture is composed of not just symbolic objects and gestures, but lived experience, then and now.

Cheeky critique of native object fetish is hardly new — Jungen has been a smash-hit at it for years, and even he owes a debt to forbears like James Luna — but Tisiga's decision to couch it in a watercolour painting style subverts his agenda as contemporary and critical. It both softens and sharpens, and catches you unaware — a tough trick for any art to pull off, but no less essential to its success because of it.

Meanwhile, at Narwhal Projects' Moon Room, which is showing some 21 artists from closer to home, whimsy is unifying sensibility – about which it makes no apologies, and fair enough. Curator Kristin Weckworth explains that she became obsessed with space exploration and the various moon missions in particular, not the least of which being the long-standing conspiracy theory that the film of Neil Armstrong taking those first, historic steps were shot on a sound stage by Stanley Kubrick as part of an elaborate U.S. governmental propaganda campaign.

Here, Weckworth marshals artists from across the spectrum of nominally rival dealers, promoting that lovely, all-for-one vibe that local galleries here display now and again but should more often. Hannah Hur checks in with a pale and delicate piece that could as easily be Matisse-ian fronds as outright abstraction; Jennifer Murphy shows a dense, circular collage work with clasped hands at its centre; Heather Goodchild contributes a cosmic swirl of a textile piece.

Weckworth scatters moments of wonder throughout: The creepy weirdness of Adrienne Kammerer's bleak graphite drawing of a skeletal figure stalking totemic stones under a two-mooned sky; Maggie Groat's “All Thing Under the Moon,” a sharp-cornered collage of inset squares with a pea-sized celestial body at its core; “Everybody Left But Us,” Margaux Williamson's exuberant smear of a painting, which is far from cosmic but pleasingly strange all the same.

Moon Room may not seek to answer the big questions, but in the absence of a point of view, it does present some lovely work with aesthetic resonance as they rub up against one another. Beauty doesn't excuse everything, but it does excuse a lot, and here, more than enough.


 Image: Jennifer Murphy.  Hands , 2003. (Courtesy: Clint Roenish Gallery)   LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:   http://www.akimbo.ca/akimblog/?id=940

Image: Jennifer Murphy. Hands, 2003. (Courtesy: Clint Roenish Gallery) 

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:

http://www.akimbo.ca/akimblog/?id=940

AKIMBO | Chimera at Craft Ontario + Moon Room at Narwhal, review by Terence Dick

Thematic exhibitions are a tricky proposition. Looking retrospectively at a single artist is so much simpler, with just one pair of hands to consider when figuring out what unites all the work and then having the arrow of chronology help you assess the artist’s trajectory. In fact, anything historical, even a group show, has at least time as an ordering principle. But when all there is to justify this gathering is some idea or argument drawn from the zeitgeist or identified in the faintly overlapping Venn diagrams that link studio to studio, the responsibility falls on the curator to hold the show together and not simply display each work for contemplation, but to arrange them so they rub up against their neighbours and generate a productive friction that makes them more than the sum of their parts. 


With Chimera, now on display at the Craft Ontario gallery space on Queen West, Morgan Mavishas brought together two artists and her artist-run home museum to explore the overlap between nature and culture, setting David R. Harper’s ceramic, embroidered, and stuffed animal spirits alongside Julie Moon’s surreal ceramic sculptures and a floor-to-ceiling arrangement of taxidermied fauna from the collection of the Contemporary Zoological Conservatory (aka Mavis’ museum). The room is crammed cheek to jowl and, while there are material links in craft from work to work, Harper’s restrained and rigid symbolism dominates, leaving Moon’s mutant models that blend body and soul a quieter presence. Mavis’ menagerie is stuck at the back and loses some of its dramatic effect due to the limited architecture, which is a shame because the combination of artists and curatorial ideas is full of promise. 

Moon Room, Kristin Weckworth's current confabulation at Narwhal Contemporary, isn't simply a collection of tributes to la lune; it riffs on the ur-text of nocturnal free association – Margaret Wise Brown's children's classic Goodnight Moon – and uses it as the jumping off point for an equally freewheeling collection of objects, from Margaux Williamson’s murky paintings to Heather Goodchild’s mythic hook rugs to a sculptural assembly by Nikki Woolsey that materializes one of the central figures in the story (“a spoon, a brush, and a bowl full of mush”) into a surreal piece of furniture. 

There are, in fact, two rooms in Moon Room, and while the first gives us an earthly perspective, the second places us on the lunar surface and surrounds us with drawings, paintings, collages, and a stained glass window high over one entrance that play off the interpretive delusions we engage in when desperately trying to discern what we see when we look up to that disc or sliver in the night sly. Some take the theme metaphorically, such as Jennifer Murphy and Maggie Groat, building on the blank surface to reflect all that earthly activity and matter we imbue with moonishness. Dipping into more celestial territory, Eli Langer’s luminescent radial line drawings, Maryanne Casasanta’s night sky, and Patrick Krzyzanowski’s star bursts (which are actually spirograph drawings made by rats) take us into deep space. You have to find your own way back. 


Craft Ontario: http://craftontario.com/exhibitions/current-exhibition/introduction.html
Chimera continues until November 22. 

Narwhal Contemporary: http://narwhalcontemporary.com/ 
Moon Room continues until November 15. 


Terence Dick is a freelance writer living in Toronto. His art criticism has appeared in Canadian Art, BorderCrossings, Prefix Photo, Camera Austria, Fuse, Mix, C Magazine, Azure, and The Globe and Mail. He is the editor of Akimblog. You can follow his quickie reviews and art news announcements on Twitter @TerenceDick.


THE VANCOUVER SUN | Nirdvandva: transcending opposites at Field Satellite, review by Kevin Griffin

Published on: November 12, 2014

NIRDVANDVA was a surprise. I liked it so much, I went back a second time to see the exhibition of works by two local artists at Field Satellite on West Broadway.

So what appealed to me about the show? First of it it’s that odd word: Nirdvandva. It intrigued me. I also liked how it sounded.

It’s the kind of word that you might think is a typo for Nirvana (In fact, Google asked the exact same thing in a search as did the spellcheck for this blog platform.) It’s not: that’s how the word is spelled. The didactic information provided by the exhibition says that it’s a Sanskrit word that refers to a person’s ability to be free from dualities. It goes on to explain that it was popularized by psychologist Carl Jung who used it to discuss dialectics a la Friedrich Hegel and transcendence.

I heard about the exhibition at an opening. I was in a crowded back room in a gallery on Main talking with other artists. In our little group one of the people was Vanessa Brown. She mentioned she was the curator of Nirdvandva, a word she had to repeat several times because I didn’t hear what she was saying amidst the chatter in the packed room. It had opened the night before. I liked how she described this odd new word and the exhibition. My first visit was the following Saturday afternoon.

What I noticed first were the sculptural works of Kuh Del Rosario. The bigger ones standing on the floor are vertical in orientation and don’t seem to have a front or a back: they can be seen from all sides. They’re made from an incredibly diverse mixture of materials that made me think of the stuff you’d find in the dump or a garbage bin. They’re not valuable, high-end materials but common bits of contemporary every day life. Stabling Blind, for example, rests on its own plinth of four, roughly painted legs that look like sawn pieces of two by fours or four by fours. The title refers to the works’ twisted window blind which outlines a lovely negative space in the loop of the bent blind. It shares its sculptural space with expandable foam, poly filla and carpet underlay.

There were other similar smaller works that were both displayed by themselves and added to the bigger sculptures. These were a combination of Borax crystals and a mix of materials such as cardboard, colored sand, and drywall compound. They had playful names such as Goo Chi and Proo Entsa. On my second visit, the artist was there and took one of the works and turned it upside down. By doing that, she showed that it was both sturdy and versatile, able to be seen from multiple viewpoints. Each of the smaller pieces looked like they were caught in the process of transforming into something. What that next thing was I couldn’t say but they all had a wonderful instability about them.

Hanging on the walls were paintings by Scott Lewis. Some reminded me of intensely urban landscapes covered with graffiti such as walls in back alleys or the sides of dumpsters. In The Electrician, spray paint was applied in sections in dense patterns of circular shapes and horizontal bars, some of which left drips similar to what you’d see when freshly applied graffiti spray paint on a wall sometimes doesn’t quite adhere properly and starts to sag. In two smaller Untitled works, the spray paint looked like it was sloughing off the surface, unable to hold its own against the vertical pull of gravity. Using only black and white, the two paintings were both able to achieve a remarkable amount of depth and surface texture not by resorting to traditional painterly illusion but by letting the paint express itself.

The exhibition pairs paintings and sculptures that visually complement each other. Both Lewis’ paintings and Rosario’s larger sculptures shared a common verticality. I found the resolution of opposites suggested by the exhibition’s title the clearest in Rosario’s smaller works which looked like they combined different physical states in one. I could also see the conflict in Lewis’ paintings between the flat surface of paint on a canvas and the way they created a feeling of depth similar to a traditional three-dimensional sculpture.

Both the paintings and the sculptures worked well in the space which looks like a former retail outlet turned into an art gallery. With its windows onto West Broadway, it felt connected to the city rather than on its own in an isolated white cube of art.

Nirdvandva is at Field Satellite until Saturday, Nov.  22. To get access to Field Satellite at 29 West Broadway, you have to get the key or arrange access at Field Contemporary, just a few doors away at 19 West Broadway..

For regular Art Seen updates, follow me on Twitter @KevinCGriffin


 Image: Work by Scott Lewis (left), and Kuh Del Rosario (right)   LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:    http://zero1magazine.com/2014/10/tomorrow-at-field-contemporary-scott-lewis-kuh-del-rosario-nirdvandva/

Image: Work by Scott Lewis (left), and Kuh Del Rosario (right)

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:

http://zero1magazine.com/2014/10/tomorrow-at-field-contemporary-scott-lewis-kuh-del-rosario-nirdvandva/

01 MAGAZINE | Tomorrow at FIELD Contemporary: Scott Lewis + Kuh Del Rosario, by Redia Soltis

A show opens tomorrow at Field Satellite called N I R D V A N D V A  showcasing work by Kuh Del Rosario andScott Lewis. The show curated by Vanessa Brown will be up until November 22nd.

FIELD Satellite is pleased to present N I R D V A N D V A, an exhibition featuring work by Vancouver-based artists Kuh Del Rosario and Scott Lewis. The title of the show takes its root in Sanskrit and refers to one´s ability to be free from dualities. The concept of Nirdvandva was later popularized in the realm of psychology by Carl Jung who used it as a frame for discussing Hegelian dialectics and the notion of transcendence. It is the ethos of Nirdvandva that is shared in the art practices of both Del Rosario and Lewis.

Although invested in material process, decay and regeneraton, both artists arrive at this commonality through their own trajectory. Del Rosario´s interrogation of sculpture recalls early memories of living in The Philippines and of witnessing objects devolve into detritus, get beaten into the earth, and then slowly grow as they compound with other materials in their proximity. Her sculptures speak to the life cycles many urban materials face as they are extracted from nature, transformed by industry only to be discarded and then consumed again by the planet until they recapitulate themselves as hybrid objects – incapable of performing their part within the logic of their desired mechanism, but mutated from nature. In Lewis´s practice the life cycle of materials articulate themselves on the canvas through a process that fluctuates between additive gesture and forced erosion. Sometimes this manifests itself in the literal application of materials such as wheat-paste posters and newsprint that are later scraped away. Sometimes this relationship is merely implied by the topographical effect that comes from mixing and manipulating paint that does not bind with its substract. Embedded in his sensibility is Lewis´s relationship to his own background as a musician and the cathartic power of post-punk noise.


 Image: N I R D V A N D V A Installation view, Kuh Del Rosario and Scott Lewis, 2014   LINK HERE:    http://www.field-contemporary.com/n-i-r-d-v-a-n-d-v-a-exhibition-images.html

Image: N I R D V A N D V A Installation view, Kuh Del Rosario and Scott Lewis, 2014

LINK HERE:

http://www.field-contemporary.com/n-i-r-d-v-a-n-d-v-a-exhibition-images.html

N I R D V A N D V A  at FIELD Contemporary

N I R D V A N D V A
Kuh Del Rosario and Scott Lewis
Curated by Vanessa Brown
October 24th — November 22nd, 2014
Opening October 23rd, 6:00 — 10:00 PM
FIELD Satellite
29 West Broadway

FIELD Satellite is pleased to present N I R D V A N D V A, an exhibition featuring work by Vancouver-based artists Kuh Del Rosario and Scott Lewis. The title of the show takes its root in Sanskrit and refers to one´s ability to be free from dualities. The concept of Nirdvandva was later popularized in the realm of psychology by Carl Jung who used it as a frame for discussing Hegelian dialectics and the notion of transcendence. It is the ethos of Nirdvandva that is shared in the art practices of both Del Rosario and Lewis.

Although invested in material process, decay and regeneraton, both artists arrive at this commonality through their own trajectory. Del Rosario´s interrogation of sculpture recalls early memories of living in The Philippines and of witnessing objects devolve into detritus, get beaten into the earth, and then slowly grow as they compound with other materials in their proximity. Her sculptures speak to the life cycles many urban materials face as they are extracted from nature, transformed by industry only to be discarded and then consumed again by the planet until they recapitulate themselves as hybrid objects - incapable of performing their part within the logic of their desired mechanism, but mutated from nature. In Lewis´s practice the life cycle of materials articulate themselves on the canvas through a process that fluctuates between additive gesture and forced erosion. Sometimes this manifests itself in the literal application of materials such as wheat-paste posters and newsprint that are later scraped away. Sometimes this relationship is merely implied by the topographical effect that comes from mixing and manipulating paint that does not bind with its substract. Embedded in his sensibility is Lewis´s relationship to his own background as a musician and the cathartic power of post-punk noise.

Kuh Del Rosario is a Vancouver-based artist whose work spans across painting, installation, video, performance, and sculpture. She has exhibited throughout Canada in both solo and group exhibitions. She is a graduate of the Alberta College of Art and Design. 

Scott Lewis is a Vancouver-based artist whose work in painting and collage is informed by an interest in mysticism, phenomenology and the affect of music. His work has been included in exhibitions throughout Canada and the United States. Lewis graduated form Emily Carr University in 2014.

N I R D V A N D V A runs from October 24th - November 22nd, 2014.

Access to FIELD Satellite can be gained by appointment at FIELD Contemporary at 19 West Broadway, Vancouver, BC (just a few doors down).

For more information contact info@field-contemporary.com or the curator at vanessanbrown@gmail.com


 Image: Other Systems Salon   LINK TO EVENT HERE:    http://cargocollective.com/othersystemssalon

Image: Other Systems Salon

LINK TO EVENT HERE:

http://cargocollective.com/othersystemssalon

Other Systems Salon at The Banff Centre for the Arts

9pm, August 7th 2014
The Banff Centre for the Arts

The Other Systems Salon asks participants to share examples of alternative methods, lifetsyles, approaches or intentions for making, showing or circulating art. This is a night to celebrate unusual paradigms for creativity outside of orthodox career paths. Have you seen, heard about or had a vision of a way to make art that engages the maker and/or audience beyond economics, genius or the academy? Is there a community, collective or organization you’ve encountered that values artists in a unique cultural way you find exciting? Presenters are invited to show their own work or the work of others in the form of a presentation, ritual, game or performance. 

This evening is open to anyone who would like to present or witness quietly. There will be group discussion and open questions.

PRESENTATIONS

Fearless
by Shary Boyle
3 brave musicians, 3 brave songs

On the Road
by Lisa Turner
This presentation will focus on ‘Drive by Press’ a duo that takes printmaking on the road, to share their enthusiasm for the printmaking medium.

Random Creative Communities
by Valerie Salez
An introduction to three interesting residencies. One in Greensboro, North Carolina called ELSEWHERE; one in a small town in Mexico that I initiated with a local artist; and one organized by friends in an underground military bunker in Nova Scotia. 

The Art Shanty Project
by Lindsay Montgomery

Holiday Traditions
by Erica Stocking
Traditions at holidays as alternative system of art making

Drawing On The Inside: Art, Architecture, and Incarceration
by Kandis Friesen
This presentation will look at the ways in which art can/not function within contexts of incarceration, touching on the work of Herman Wallace, Jesse Krimes, and Drawing Incarceration, an ongoing drawing workshop out of a federal prison in Québec.

Little Goodboy Wolf
by Luke Parnell
A recitation of an old poem about fairytales and colonialism.

Other Art Practices
by Kerri Reid
An introduction to the art practices of Ray Materson, an embroiderer who learned his skills using threads from socks he unravelled while serving a 15 year prison sentence, and Leah Rosenberg, an artist whose painting practice lead her to cake-decorating and eventually a position as a pastry chef at SFMOMA. 

The Dead Ringers
by Valerie, Vanessa, and Chloe
A quasi-structured improvisation with handbells

Untitled
by Sarah Ciurysek
A poem comprised of found texts

Nils Nilsson Skum
by Andrew Taggart
A tiny introduction to Nils Nilsson Skum

On Helge Schneider and the Art of Improvisation
by Mike Bourscheid
A presentation on the fascinating talents of comedian and musician Helge Schneider. A look at how improvisation can be used in music, theatre, and prop design. 

A Charmingly Remote Artist Residency in Norway with a segue into a Few Inspirational Museums
by Chloe Lewis
A presentation on a remote artist residency in Norway, and a few inspirational museums.

Guts
by Erica Stocking
Wondering what happens in digestion....

Untitled
by Maria Amaro Cavada
A performance about possibility/impossibility.

Thank You
by Shary Boyle
A traditional form of gratitude, in a few images

Other, Other Systems
Reflections on Other Systems
by Sheri Nault
A letter to salon attendees

Moth Performance
by Yvonne Mullock
Site-specific installation

Alter-Egos: Chat Perdu presents her process
by Anna-Binta Diallo
A video interview

Calendar by Becky Comber
Framework by Shary Boyle
Event organized by Vanessa Brown

9pm, August 7th 2014
The Banff Centre for the Arts, Professional Development Centre (PDC) Room 102. Banff, Alberta.


VIA: The Opening | Vanessa Brown + Deirdre McAdams at FIELD Contemporary

By Alex Quicho - May 23rd 2014

Something strange has appeared on West Broadway. Sandwiched between the hole-in-the-wall eateries and outdoor apparel shops is a storefront filled with, not Gore-tex or vietnamese subs, but alluring and ambiguous forms. The space is called FIELD Contemporary; the art is by Vanessa Brown and Deirdre McAdams.

Though West Broadway is an unusual locale for a contemporary art gallery, director Daniel Jefferies assures me that the choice was intentional, not just made out of necessity. (The fact that the space is beautiful — compact but roomy and full of light, as a gallery ought to be — is a bonus.) “I’ve wanted to be a little more independent from what was happening here already, hence the location. This is not your typical standalone gallery that you would find in Vancouver, but everyone has been super supportive.” 

“My feeling is that it’s not about saying, ‘we’re going to make something new that Vancouver doesn’t have,’ it’s more about contributing to the diversity of the venues that people can show in,” adds Brown. We are sitting on the floor and drinking kalimoxto, gathered around my recording device like we’re at a campfire. Between everyone involved, there is an obvious closeness: this is perhaps the clearest indicator that FIELD is already accomplishing what it has set out to do.

Together with associate directors Avalon Mott and Brandon Cotter, Jefferies opened FIELD with a vision of fostering more experimentation, more support, and more openness in Vancouver’s artistic community — most especially for recent graduates and emerging artists. The exhibition of work by Brown and McAdams is their first, and in many ways, it’s a perfect choice. Though Brown and McAdams have both graduated from ECUAD within the past few years, their work is clarified and mature. There is a powerful dialogue between McAdams’ minimal paintings and Brown’s intertwining sculptural forms: both work intuitively, building distinct aesthetic vocabularies through experimenting with material.

“One thing that I thought was really great was when they approached me, there was a crazy amount of support,” Brown explains. “Daniel was happy to support the work I’m currently making, but he was also really interested in potentially more experimental work, or me just trying something out, which was amazing. It was so refreshing to meet with someone who says to you, ‘I like what you do, I know a bit of your history, and I want to support you. If you have any ideas about what could happen here, you should present them.'”

“I’m really happy with how our work came together,” McAdams adds.

Jefferies discovered both through chance; he had seen McAdams’ work at a group exhibition at WAAP, and found Brown when he was seeking out a studio space for himself upon first arriving in Vancouver. It’s the sort of serendipity that one finds shocking — there is so much that the two artists have in common that it is hard to believe that they hadn’t met before Jefferies brought them together for Outside A Marble Palace.

The exhibition itself is thoughtful and well-balanced. One can sense the intense deliberation with which each painting was hung or sculpture set into place. Both Brown and McAdams are articulate and speak easily about their process; however, their work succeeds most in how it slips in and out of language. Too often, we are compelled to resist what we don’t immediately understand — but Outside A Marble Palace has delighted viewers so far, regardless of their artistic training.

“This series became all about signs and symbols and stand-ins for language,” explains McAdams. “That is basically all painting can do, in a way: poetically hint at meaning. It’s a really indirect way of communicating.”

“I understand that people sometimes really look for easily articulable qualities in work,” Brown adds. “I realize that I’m much more interested in the evocative potential of artwork — something that can resonate, even in a non-verbal way, within you.”

She tells me of one individual who discussed her work by pointing out shapes seen in it. “It’s a guitar,” or “it’s a woman,” she would say.

“I hadn’t thought of it that way,” Brown said. “But I’m really interested in what people can see in it. Sometimes that connection is really tangible, but it’s not so simple to talk about.”


 Image: Vanessa Brown (left), Deirdre McAdams (right)   LINK HERE:    http://www.field-contemporary.com/outside-a-marble-palace.html

Image: Vanessa Brown (left), Deirdre McAdams (right)

LINK HERE:

http://www.field-contemporary.com/outside-a-marble-palace.html

Outside a Marble Palace at FIELD Contemporary

FIELD Contemporary is pleased to present Deirdre McAdams and Vanessa Brown together in its inaugural exhibition, Outside A Marble Palace. New works by both artists will be exhibited, highlighting McAdams’ paintings and Brown’s sculptures.

Deirdre McAdams is a visual artist living and working in Vancouver BC, Canada. She is a graduate of Emily Carr University of Art and Design (2008), and the Victoria College of Art (2003), where she studied painting. She was awarded an Honourable Mention in the 2011 RBC Painting Competition, as well as a prize in 2010 from Canadian Art Magazine for her writing on contemporary art. Her practice represents an engagement with the minimal vocabulary of geometric and optical abstraction, and is characterized by a spirit of experimentation within the limits of pre-determined methodological confines.

Vanessa Brown is a Vancouver-based artist who works predominantly in sculpture. She graduated with a BFA from Emily Carr University in 2013 and was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award. She has exhibited in Montreal, Vancouver and Berlin. As a female sculptor she is invested in the history of 20th century sculpture and particularly in re-examining the heroic, the monumental, and the macho. She works predominantly in steel and seeks to parse the space between its associations with industry, weaponry and brutality, with its more subtle qualities such as pliability, versatility and slightness. By turning toward the intimate possibilities within sculpture, she hopes to open a space wherein a conversation about poetics and semiotics can take place alongside of the material and visceral experience of the work.

Opening reception April 24th, 2014. Exhibition running April 25th, 2014 through May 24th, 2014.

Field Contemporary is open to the public Tuesday-Friday 12pm-5pm, Saturday 1pm-6pm, and by appointment.
 


 Image: Deirdre McAdams. Residuals, 2014   LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:    http://www.connect.ecuad.ca/about/news/311654

Image: Deirdre McAdams. Residuals, 2014

LINK TO ARTICLE HERE:

http://www.connect.ecuad.ca/about/news/311654

Emily Carr University Announcements | Outside a Marble Palace: Vanessa Brown + Deirdre McAdams 

Field Contemporary is presenting Deirdre McAdams ('08) and Vanessa Brown ('13) together in its inaugural exhibition Outside A Marble Palace. New works by both artists will be exhibited, highlighting McAdams’ paintings and Brown’s sculptures.

An opening reception takes place on April 24, 2014, from 7 to 9pm. The exhibition runs from April 25 through May 24, 2014.

Deirdre McAdams is a visual artist living and working in Vancouver BC, Canada. She is a graduate of Emily Carr University of Art and Design (2008), and the Victoria College of Art (2003), where she studied painting. She was awarded an honorable mention in the 2011 RBC Painting Competition, as well as a prize in 2010 from Canadian Art Magazine for her writing on contemporary art. Her practice represents an engagement with the minimal vocabulary of geometric and optical abstraction, and is characterized by a spirit of experimentation within the limits of pre-determined methodological confines.

Vanessa Brown is a Vancouver- based artist who works predominantly in sculpture. She graduated with a BFA from Emily Carr University in 2013 and was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award. She has exhibited in Montreal, Vancouver and Berlin. As a female sculptor she is invested in the history of 20th century sculpture and particularly in re-examining the heroic, the monumental, and the macho. She works predominantly in steel and seeks to parse the space between its associations with industry, weaponry and brutality, with its more subtle qualities such as pliability, versatility and slightness. By turning toward the intimate possibilities within sculpture, she hopes to open a space wherein a conversation about poetics and semiotics can take place alongside of the material and visceral experience of the work.


 Image: Vanessa Brown. Heavy Metal Flowers, 2013   LINK HERE:    http://www.thecryingroom.org/mural.html

Image: Vanessa Brown. Heavy Metal Flowers, 2013

LINK HERE:

http://www.thecryingroom.org/mural.html

The Crying Room Mural Project

The Crying Room began in 1999 by Vancouver artist Colleen Heslin as a gallery space to exhibit local emerging artists. Several artists along the way have helped shape and form the exhibitions and direction of the space; Elizabeth Zvonar, Jason McLean and Steven Horwood played vital roles for the inception, content and context of the space. The Crying Room has presented and hosted over 50 exhibitions with a wide range of media: drawing, photography, collage, books, dolls, sound, installation, performance, sculpture, mixed media, video, posters, drawing booths, G8 action figures, concerts, dollar sales, etc...Currently the only public exhibition space is the mural project space in the front of the gallery, and this virtual space.

The Crying Room, 157 East Cordova Street, Vancouver BC, V6A 1K7


 Image: Laurie Spiegel, The Expanding Universe   LINK HERE:    http://cargocollective.com/TheGoldenEar

Image: Laurie Spiegel, The Expanding Universe

LINK HERE:

http://cargocollective.com/TheGoldenEar

The Golden Ear

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